Brian's guitar Advice

Brian's guitar Advice

Guitar Advice

My advice to guitar players



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Re: I need a guiter chords

: : : : Please give a suggestion about guiter and give me guiter chords

Re: I need a guiter chords

: : : : : Please give a suggestion about guiter and give me guiter chords

Re: I need a guiter chords

: : : : : : Please give a suggestion about guiter and give me guiter chords especially on bass guiter

Conn Acoustic Guitars

I have a Conn acoustic guitar dated 1960 with serial number 78. It still looks and plays great, but I usually prefer my Alvarez because I can plug straight into the board. Although the Conn was made in Japan, I would hope it's antiquity, low serial number , and great shape might make it worth somthing to a collector. Does anyone even have a slightest clue of what a good selling price for this item may be.

Re: Conn Acoustic Guitars

Sean, if that model has blond stripes on blond sides, and has metal strings, it sold for $100.00 new. I bought mine for $150.00 and never regretted it. If you have one like that, I'll give you $150.00 if it is in usable condition. I like the sound of that model.If it is one of the classical models with nylons strings, it was worth less than that. I have a Conn acoustic guitar dated 1960 with serial number 78. It still looks and plays great, but I usually prefer my Alvarez because I can plug straight into the board. Although the Conn was made in Japan, I would hope it's antiquity, low serial number , and great shape might make it worth somthing to a collector. Does anyone even have a slightest clue of what a good selling price for this item may be.

Re: Conn Acoustic Guitars

: I have a Conn acoustic guitar dated 1960 with serial number 78. It still looks and plays great, but I usually prefer my Alvarez because I can plug straight into the board. Although the Conn was made in Japan, I would hope it's antiquity, low serial number , and great shape might make it worth somthing to a collector. Does anyone even have a slightest clue of what a good selling price for this item may be.

Sean, I purchased a Conn 12-string in 2000, but don't know how to read the serial number to get the date of manufacture. This guitar has a Zero-nut fret, something I can't find on any guitar today up to $3,500 even. It plays the best of any 12-string I've ever held, and only equaled by an Ovation Custom Balladeer 12-string I played in the early 70's (made in USA then). My instrument is pretty beat up, which has zero effect on how it sounds it seems. I bought it for under $200 from a locally major music store who was embarassed due to it's looks to sell it and obviously didn't know squat about what the Zero-nut fret and sound meant. Perhaps most of their customers are into the Washburn "pretty face" factor - I buy instruments for their sound and playability, irregardless of the curb appeal. Sorry if this doesn't help much. Good luck with your instrument!

bass guiter chords

please give me bass guiter chords

Re: bass guiter chords

: please give me bass guiter chords tim mcgraws just to see you smile watch the wihd blow by & something like that thanks

Re: bass guiter chords

: please give me bass guiter chords tim mcgraws just to see you smile watch the wihd blow by & something like that thanks

Re: bass guiter chords

: please give me bass guiter chords

chords

: : please give me bass guiter chords
i want

Re: bass guiter chords

: : please give me bass guiter chords and tabs

Re: bass guiter lessons

: : please give me bass guiter lessons

Re: bass guiter chords

: please give me <font style="COLOR:black;BACKGROUND-COLOR:ffff66" >bass</font> <font style="COLOR:black;BACKGROUND-COLOR:A0ffff" >guiter</font> chords

Re: bass guiter chords

: please give me bass guiter chords

bass guiter chords

I am a new Bass player please send me the basic chords of the Bass guiter please. I
also want learn more, please give me bass guiter chords

Re: bass guiter chords

: I am a new Bass player please send me the basic chords of the Bass guiter please. I
: also want learn more, please give me bass guiter chords

Re: rythmn guiter chords

: : I am a new rythmn player please send me the basic chords of the rythmn guiter please. I
: : also want learn more, please give me rythmn guiter chords and also how to use advance chords in song e.g c7b5 and etc

Re: bass guiter chords

: please show me chord C major .

need electric guitar

i need electroacoustic guitar

Re: need electric guitar

Yo! fun...
i like it :)
John
<a href="http://www.toshain.com">painting</a>

Conn Acoustic guitars

has anyone ever heard of a conn acoustic guitar and if so are they any good?

Re: Conn Acoustic guitars

I have a Conn acoustic model F-11 (I think. It's hard to read the model #) purchased in 1976. I'm trying to get a price on for insurance purposes. Can anybody help?

Re: Conn Acoustic guitars

: has anyone ever heard of a conn acoustic guitar and if so are they any good?

Re: Conn Acoustic guitars

: : : has anyone ever heard of a conn acoustic guitar and if so are they any good?

: Yes, indeed! I have a 12-string Conn Acoustic guitar, purchased in 1977. I love it now as much as then, and I also own a Guild 12-string. The sound is mellow and beautiful and just gets better with age. My question--are 12-string Conn's still manufactured and if so, who carries them?

I too have a Conn 12-string. It is the only 12-string, or guitar for that matter I can find with a Zero-nut fret, if you know what that is. It is a fret, imediately after the nut, that the strings rest directly on after comming off the nut. This makes the action so low and easy to play, many of my friends think it plays easier than their 6 strings. It's sound is very mellow and full - the body is a bit worked over, but I bought it new for under $200 and the store was embarassed to sell it to me due to it's appearance. I've only played an early 70's ovation 12-string (balladeer made in USA) that played as easily, and none as full sounding. Neither Music123.com nor Musiciansfriend.com have Conn as a brand. I'm afraid it's probably an excellent mid-range guitar produced by the brass company (conn trumpets, etc.), and probably designed by a master of the art but never caught on due to lack of celebrity endorsement, etc. I would love to find a 6-string of the same calibre (Zero nut fret, etc.). Good luck in your search.

Re: Conn Acoustic guitars

: : : : has anyone ever heard of a conn acoustic guitar and if so are they any good?

: : Yes, indeed! I have a 12-string Conn Acoustic guitar, purchased in 1977. I love it now as much as then, and I also own a Guild 12-string. The sound is mellow and beautiful and just gets better with age. My question--are 12-string Conn's still manufactured and if so, who carries them?

: I too have a Conn 12-string. It is the only 12-string, or guitar for that matter I can find with a Zero-nut fret, if you know what that is. It is a fret, imediately after the nut, that the strings rest directly on after comming off the nut. This makes the action so low and easy to play, many of my friends think it plays easier than their 6 strings. Its sound is very mellow and full - the body is a bit worked over, but I bought it new for under $200 and the store was embarassed to sell it to me due to it's appearance. I've only played an early 70's ovation 12-string (balladeer made in USA) that played as easily, and none as full sounding. Neither Music123.com nor Musiciansfriend.com have Conn as a brand. I'm afraid it's probably an excellent mid-range guitar produced by the brass company (conn trumpets, etc.), and probably designed by a master of the art but never caught on due to lack of celebrity endorsement, etc. I would love to find a 6-string of the same calibre (Zero nut fret, etc.). Good luck in your search.

I meant I bought it used in 2000, but don't know how to read the serial number to see how old it is.

Re: Conn Acoustic guitars

: : : : : has anyone ever heard of a conn acoustic guitar and if so are they any good?

: : : Yes, indeed! I have a 12-string Conn Acoustic guitar, purchased in 1977. I love it now as much as then, and I also own a Guild 12-string. The sound is mellow and beautiful and just gets better with age. My question--are 12-string Conn's still manufactured and if so, who carries them?

: : I too have a Conn 12-string. It is the only 12-string, or guitar for that matter I can find with a Zero-nut fret, if you know what that is. It is a fret, imediately after the nut, that the strings rest directly on after comming off the nut. This makes the action so low and easy to play, many of my friends think it plays easier than their 6 strings. Its sound is very mellow and full - the body is a bit worked over, but I bought it new for under $200 and the store was embarassed to sell it to me due to it's appearance. I've only played an early 70's ovation 12-string (balladeer made in USA) that played as easily, and none as full sounding. Neither Music123.com nor Musiciansfriend.com have Conn as a brand. I'm afraid it's probably an excellent mid-range guitar produced by the brass company (conn trumpets, etc.), and probably designed by a master of the art but never caught on due to lack of celebrity endorsement, etc. I would love to find a 6-string of the same calibre (Zero nut fret, etc.). Good luck in your search.

: I meant I bought it used in 2000, but don't know how to read the serial number to see how old it is.

I went shopping on lunch break and saw a Conn in a junk store. Don't know model, serial, etc. 6 string acoustic with case for $75.00 with case. Good Buy ????
Respond ASAP. Thanks

Re: Conn Acoustic guitars

: : : : : : has anyone ever heard of a conn acoustic guitar and if so are they any good?

: : : : Yes, indeed! I have a 12-string Conn Acoustic guitar, purchased in 1977. I love it now as much as then, and I also own a Guild 12-string. The sound is mellow and beautiful and just gets better with age. My question--are 12-string Conn's still manufactured and if so, who carries them?

: : : I too have a Conn 12-string. It is the only 12-string, or guitar for that matter I can find with a Zero-nut fret, if you know what that is. It is a fret, imediately after the nut, that the strings rest directly on after comming off the nut. This makes the action so low and easy to play, many of my friends think it plays easier than their 6 strings. Its sound is very mellow and full - the body is a bit worked over, but I bought it new for under $200 and the store was embarassed to sell it to me due to it's appearance. I've only played an early 70's ovation 12-string (balladeer made in USA) that played as easily, and none as full sounding. Neither Music123.com nor Musiciansfriend.com have Conn as a brand. I'm afraid it's probably an excellent mid-range guitar produced by the brass company (conn trumpets, etc.), and probably designed by a master of the art but never caught on due to lack of celebrity endorsement, etc. I would love to find a 6-string of the same calibre (Zero nut fret, etc.). Good luck in your search.

: : I meant I bought it used in 2000, but don't know how to read the serial number to see how old it is.

: I went shopping on lunch break and saw a Conn in a junk store. Don't know model, serial, etc. 6 string acoustic with case for $75.00 with case. Good Buy ????
: Respond ASAP. Thanks

: In 1987 I bought Conn 6-string from a pawn shop in Lawton, OK while serving a couple years in the army at Ft. Sill. Paid $70 and have had many people tell me through the years how great it sounds.

The serial number is 52760415 and model number is F21SB. No one ever seems to have heard of Conn, but I always felt like I had stumbled onto a great find. Now that I've read how others describe their guitars and the way they sound, I know it was a real find.

The guitar has the sunburst coloring which is somewhat garish, but it has lots of character and sounds sweet.

If anyone gets a chance to buy one of these guitars for under $100, do not hesitate. You'll love playing it.

Re: Conn Acoustic guitars

 Conn Acoustic guitars

This popular thread has been given its own page : Re: Conn Acoustic guitars

Re: Conn Acoustic guitars

: : has anyone ever heard of a conn acoustic guitar and if so are they any good?

Yes, indeed! I have a 12-string Conn Acoustic guitar, purchased in 1977. I love it now as much as then, and I also own a Guild 12-string. The sound is mellow and beautiful and just gets better with age. My question--are 12-string Conn's still manufactured and if so, who carries them?

Re: Conn Acoustic guitars

: has anyone ever heard of a conn acoustic guitar and if so are they any good?

I've had one for 27 years... F27 model (D-35 knock-off) bought in college... couldn't afford a Martin, so bought this... most folks say it still sounds as good as any Martin...

Re: Conn Acoustic guitars

: : has anyone ever heard of a conn acoustic guitar and if so are they any good?

:
: I've had one for 27 years... F27 model (D-35 knock-off) bought in college... couldn't afford a Martin, so bought this... most folks say it still sounds as good as any Martin...

: I've had one for about 28 years. It was my first guitar and I still think it sounds great!

Re: Conn Acoustic guitars

I've owned and loved my Conn for almost 10yrs. I have never heard of anyone else owning one or even heard of one. I'm curious about the company. If its the same as C.G. Conn that makes all the brass and wind instruments. Also looking for a good site that would show me info on value and different types of Conn acoustic guitars.

Re: Conn Acoustic guitars

: I've owned and loved my Conn for almost 10yrs. I have never heard of anyone else owning one or even heard of one. I'm curious about the company. If its the same as C.G. Conn that makes all the brass and wind instruments. Also looking for a good site that would show me info on value and different types of Conn acoustic guitars.
Hello Dave W.I have one and I know the history of the company.

Re: Conn Acoustic guitars

I've just come across a Conn F27 guitar. I'm taking care of it for a friend while he travels abroad. I've always been impressed with this guitar. It sounds so full and the action is great. He had the same strings on there for years and then put it in the back of his car without a case, and drove a few hundred miles. When I picked it up out of the trunck, the E string was perfectly in tune, and the others just off, so it was easy to tune the thing up!

that says a lot for craftsmenship...

Re: Conn Acoustic guitars

yea i actually have one

Re: Conn Acoustic guitars

I have a Conn too, and i cant really find any info on them over the net. it's a model F-10 and i have no clue what it's worth, but it still sounds and plays well. if anyone finds out any info please e-mail

Re: Conn Acoustic guitars

I have a conn guitar its a model f-27, wanted to know if you found any information on the guitar. we're also looking for info. if you can please e-mail back thanks

advice

hi
do you suggest that i buy the (gibson les paul standard) or
(the gibson les paul studio)
price doesnt matter
thank you

First Floyd Rose Equipped Guitar

First Floyd Rose Equipped Guitar

This popular thread has been given its own page : First Floyd Rose Equipped Guitar

need advice on lead guiter

iv been playing rythem for five years if any one could help me on lead i would be greatful thanks jamie

Re: need advice on lead guiter

What you know at this point is chords, probably most of the first position "open" chords, plus several movable "block" chord shapes.

To play rhythm is a band, you would use these forms to build a bridge betwwen the bass player's part and the drummer's part,
mainly by playing the lower portion of the chord (the lower 4 strings & sometimes the middle 4 strings).
Usually, the rhythm player only plays the upper 4 strings for accents, like horn section "punches".

(If you always strum all 6 strings for whatever chord, it makes you sound like an amateur folksinger "hummer & strummer")

Together, the 3 of you create the context that allows the notes the singer or lead player chooses to have their particular
effect, emotion, color, nuance, impact, suggestion or what-have-you. It is mainly the notes that are "held" or sustained
that form the "meat" of a section of melody. There are notes that reinforce or "double" notes of the chord being played;
there are notes that are "neighbors tones" to these essential notes; there are "inbetween" notes that fit the scale of the key
the song is in; there are other "inbetween" notes that are "bad" when you sustain them, but OK when you zip thru them on
the way to another note that is "good"; and there are "WRONG" notes.

WRONG notes: If the Rhythm player is playing C Major, the note C# sounds wrong if held, but sounds OK if you're playing the
notes D - C# - C. If you hit the C# by accident while improvising, go to D quickly, then to another note in the chord (E or G) and hold that note
before you go to C. This works much better then if you go from the "bad" C# directly to C. The C# was higher that the target note, so you
cover up by continuing higher still. If you hit a "bad" note that is lower that the target note, it can go either way, depending on taste, but you
need to set you own strategy for creating "escapes" like this.

Against a C chord, G# also sounds wrong, but note quite as wrong as C# did. Also, against a C chord, F# is "out", but still useful if you explore
strategies for "escaping" it.

Lead guitar melody is mostly played on the 4 highest strings, because high notes have "thinner" timbre" and can "ride" on top of the foundation
more clearly, even for non-chord tones.

For a rhythm player, you need to build on what you already know by learning (& learning really, really, really well), the 5 moveable chord shapes
for major, minor, dominant 7, major 7 and "6" (major) chords. For this purpose, stick to the key of G and start with the major chord shapes. At the
3rd position (1st finger @ 3rd fret), it's the same as the top 4 notes of the G bar chord, but you DO NOT use your 1st finger the same way.
You use just the tip of your 1st finger to fret the 2 highest notes, then your middle & ring fingers to get the
next 2 lower tones (leaving your pinkie free to add notes to the cluster, if you like).

Next: 5th position (1st finger @ 5th fret) - this is hard to learn - you hand will rebel (actually it's the "hand" INSIDE YOUR BRAIN that balks, that needs
to be taught by repetition of forming a new shape). It's like the D shape in first postion, but you use different fingers because you need to use your
index to get the note that was "open" for the first position. Your pinkie gets a real workout here. GET USED TO IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Next: 7th position (1st finger @ 7th fret) - this is another less familiar chord shape. It's like the C chord in 1st position, but you bar the top 3 strings with
your index finger.

Next: 10th postion - this is the "other" bar chord shape, but your index FINGERTIP only gets the note on the high string. You fret the other 3 noted on the 12th fret
however works best, but try out some "challenging" combinations to build versatility. Some guys plant their middle, ring & pinkie fingers bunched up, one per
string. I use myh middle & ring together (they BOTH fret the string in the middle of the group), leaving my pinkie free to add naother note.

Finally: 12th position - your index bars the same 3 "inner" notes that you fumbled with at the previous position and your pinkie (or ring finger) to get the
high note at the 15th (!) fret. You're high up the neck - nosebleed time!

These are the 5 "boxes" (positions) for building lead melodies over a G chord (& for songs in the Key of G major or E minor, in general).

These shapes ALWAYS repeat in the same order, no matter what key you are in. These are different "voicings" of the G Major chord. they each have certain
uses, certain strengths & liabilities. Learn to zip up & down the neck thru all 5 positions.

Lastly: for those chord shapes that you are slowest forming "on the fly", develop the habit of positioning the fingers that tend to want to "wait" (usually the ring &
pinkie fingers) before the "easy" index & middle fingers.

Let me know if this is useful.

P.S. Sustain is enhanced by finger vibrato. Finger vibrato is developed S L O W L Y, with patience, over many weeks or months.
If you rush developing your vibrato, you will "embed" a frantic, ineffective, "garageband" effect that will prove to be self-defeating
in the long term (but does have some appeal, in certain limited situations).

GD

Re: need advice on lead guiter and note guiter

: What you know at this point is chords, probably most of the first position "open" chords, plus several movable "block" chord shapes.

: To play rhythm is a band, you would use these forms to build a bridge betwwen the bass player's part and the drummer's part,
: mainly by playing the lower portion of the chord (the lower 4 strings & sometimes the middle 4 strings).
: Usually, the rhythm player only plays the upper 4 strings for accents, like horn section "punches".

: (If you always strum all 6 strings for whatever chord, it makes you sound like an amateur folksinger "hummer & strummer")

: Together, the 3 of you create the context that allows the notes the singer or lead player chooses to have their particular
: effect, emotion, color, nuance, impact, suggestion or what-have-you. It is mainly the notes that are "held" or sustained
: that form the "meat" of a section of melody. There are notes that reinforce or "double" notes of the chord being played;
: there are notes that are "neighbors tones" to these essential notes; there are "inbetween" notes that fit the scale of the key
: the song is in; there are other "inbetween" notes that are "bad" when you sustain them, but OK when you zip thru them on
: the way to another note that is "good"; and there are "WRONG" notes.

: WRONG notes: If the Rhythm player is playing C Major, the note C# sounds wrong if held, but sounds OK if you're playing the
: notes D - C# - C. If you hit the C# by accident while improvising, go to D quickly, then to another note in the chord (E or G) and hold that note
: before you go to C. This works much better then if you go from the "bad" C# directly to C. The C# was higher that the target note, so you
: cover up by continuing higher still. If you hit a "bad" note that is lower that the target note, it can go either way, depending on taste, but you
: need to set you own strategy for creating "escapes" like this.

: Against a C chord, G# also sounds wrong, but note quite as wrong as C# did. Also, against a C chord, F# is "out", but still useful if you explore
: strategies for "escaping" it.

: Lead guitar melody is mostly played on the 4 highest strings, because high notes have "thinner" timbre" and can "ride" on top of the foundation
: more clearly, even for non-chord tones.

: For a rhythm player, you need to build on what you already know by learning (& learning really, really, really well), the 5 moveable chord shapes
: for major, minor, dominant 7, major 7 and "6" (major) chords. For this purpose, stick to the key of G and start with the major chord shapes. At the
: 3rd position (1st finger @ 3rd fret), it's the same as the top 4 notes of the G bar chord, but you DO NOT use your 1st finger the same way.
: You use just the tip of your 1st finger to fret the 2 highest notes, then your middle & ring fingers to get the
: next 2 lower tones (leaving your pinkie free to add notes to the cluster, if you like).

: Next: 5th position (1st finger @ 5th fret) - this is hard to learn - you hand will rebel (actually it's the "hand" INSIDE YOUR BRAIN that balks, that needs
: to be taught by repetition of forming a new shape). It's like the D shape in first postion, but you use different fingers because you need to use your
: index to get the note that was "open" for the first position. Your pinkie gets a real workout here. GET USED TO IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

: Next: 7th position (1st finger @ 7th fret) - this is another less familiar chord shape. It's like the C chord in 1st position, but you bar the top 3 strings with
: your index finger.

: Next: 10th postion - this is the "other" bar chord shape, but your index FINGERTIP only gets the note on the high string. You fret the other 3 noted on the 12th fret
: however works best, but try out some "challenging" combinations to build versatility. Some guys plant their middle, ring & pinkie fingers bunched up, one per
: string. I use myh middle & ring together (they BOTH fret the string in the middle of the group), leaving my pinkie free to add naother note.

: Finally: 12th position - your index bars the same 3 "inner" notes that you fumbled with at the previous position and your pinkie (or ring finger) to get the
: high note at the 15th (!) fret. You're high up the neck - nosebleed time!

: These are the 5 "boxes" (positions) for building lead melodies over a G chord (& for songs in the Key of G major or E minor, in general).

: These shapes ALWAYS repeat in the same order, no matter what key you are in. These are different "voicings" of the G Major chord. they each have certain
: uses, certain strengths & liabilities. Learn to zip up & down the neck thru all 5 positions.

: Lastly: for those chord shapes that you are slowest forming "on the fly", develop the habit of positioning the fingers that tend to want to "wait" (usually the ring &
: pinkie fingers) before the "easy" index & middle fingers.

: Let me know if this is useful.

: P.S. Sustain is enhanced by finger vibrato. Finger vibrato is developed S L O W L Y, with patience, over many weeks or months.
: If you rush developing your vibrato, you will "embed" a frantic, ineffective, "garageband" effect that will prove to be self-defeating
: in the long term (but does have some appeal, in certain limited situations).

: GD

bass guiter chords

: What you know at this point is chords, probably most of the first position "open" chords, plus several movable "block" chord shapes.

: To play rhythm is a band, you would use these forms to build a bridge betwwen the bass player's part and the drummer's part,
: mainly by playing the lower portion of the chord (the lower 4 strings & sometimes the middle 4 strings).
: Usually, the rhythm player only plays the upper 4 strings for accents, like horn section "punches".

: (If you always strum all 6 strings for whatever chord, it makes you sound like an amateur folksinger "hummer & strummer")

: Together, the 3 of you create the context that allows the notes the singer or lead player chooses to have their particular
: effect, emotion, color, nuance, impact, suggestion or what-have-you. It is mainly the notes that are "held" or sustained
: that form the "meat" of a section of melody. There are notes that reinforce or "double" notes of the chord being played;
: there are notes that are "neighbors tones" to these essential notes; there are "inbetween" notes that fit the scale of the key
: the song is in; there are other "inbetween" notes that are "bad" when you sustain them, but OK when you zip thru them on
: the way to another note that is "good"; and there are "WRONG" notes.

: WRONG notes: If the Rhythm player is playing C Major, the note C# sounds wrong if held, but sounds OK if you're playing the
: notes D - C# - C. If you hit the C# by accident while improvising, go to D quickly, then to another note in the chord (E or G) and hold that note
: before you go to C. This works much better then if you go from the "bad" C# directly to C. The C# was higher that the target note, so you
: cover up by continuing higher still. If you hit a "bad" note that is lower that the target note, it can go either way, depending on taste, but you
: need to set you own strategy for creating "escapes" like this.

: Against a C chord, G# also sounds wrong, but note quite as wrong as C# did. Also, against a C chord, F# is "out", but still useful if you explore
: strategies for "escaping" it.

: Lead guitar melody is mostly played on the 4 highest strings, because high notes have "thinner" timbre" and can "ride" on top of the foundation
: more clearly, even for non-chord tones.

: For a rhythm player, you need to build on what you already know by learning (& learning really, really, really well), the 5 moveable chord shapes
: for major, minor, dominant 7, major 7 and "6" (major) chords. For this purpose, stick to the key of G and start with the major chord shapes. At the
: 3rd position (1st finger @ 3rd fret), it's the same as the top 4 notes of the G bar chord, but you DO NOT use your 1st finger the same way.
: You use just the tip of your 1st finger to fret the 2 highest notes, then your middle & ring fingers to get the
: next 2 lower tones (leaving your pinkie free to add notes to the cluster, if you like).

: Next: 5th position (1st finger @ 5th fret) - this is hard to learn - you hand will rebel (actually it's the "hand" INSIDE YOUR BRAIN that balks, that needs
: to be taught by repetition of forming a new shape). It's like the D shape in first postion, but you use different fingers because you need to use your
: index to get the note that was "open" for the first position. Your pinkie gets a real workout here. GET USED TO IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

: Next: 7th position (1st finger @ 7th fret) - this is another less familiar chord shape. It's like the C chord in 1st position, but you bar the top 3 strings with
: your index finger.

: Next: 10th postion - this is the "other" bar chord shape, but your index FINGERTIP only gets the note on the high string. You fret the other 3 noted on the 12th fret
: however works best, but try out some "challenging" combinations to build versatility. Some guys plant their middle, ring & pinkie fingers bunched up, one per
: string. I use myh middle & ring together (they BOTH fret the string in the middle of the group), leaving my pinkie free to add naother note.

: Finally: 12th position - your index bars the same 3 "inner" notes that you fumbled with at the previous position and your pinkie (or ring finger) to get the
: high note at the 15th (!) fret. You're high up the neck - nosebleed time!

: These are the 5 "boxes" (positions) for building lead melodies over a G chord (& for songs in the Key of G major or E minor, in general).

: These shapes ALWAYS repeat in the same order, no matter what key you are in. These are different "voicings" of the G Major chord. they each have certain
: uses, certain strengths & liabilities. Learn to zip up & down the neck thru all 5 positions.

: Lastly: for those chord shapes that you are slowest forming "on the fly", develop the habit of positioning the fingers that tend to want to "wait" (usually the ring &
: pinkie fingers) before the "easy" index & middle fingers.

: Let me know if this is useful.

: P.S. Sustain is enhanced by finger vibrato. Finger vibrato is developed S L O W L Y, with patience, over many weeks or months.
: If you rush developing your vibrato, you will "embed" a frantic, ineffective, "garageband" effect that will prove to be self-defeating
: in the long term (but does have some appeal, in certain limited situations).

: GD

Re: bass guiter chords

: : What you know at this point is chords, probably most of the first position "open" chords, plus several movable "block" chord shapes.

: : To play rhythm is a band, you would use these forms to build a bridge betwwen the bass player's part and the drummer's part,
: : mainly by playing the lower portion of the chord (the lower 4 strings & sometimes the middle 4 strings).
: : Usually, the rhythm player only plays the upper 4 strings for accents, like horn section "punches".

: : (If you always strum all 6 strings for whatever chord, it makes you sound like an amateur folksinger "hummer & strummer")

: : Together, the 3 of you create the context that allows the notes the singer or lead player chooses to have their particular
: : effect, emotion, color, nuance, impact, suggestion or what-have-you. It is mainly the notes that are "held" or sustained
: : that form the "meat" of a section of melody. There are notes that reinforce or "double" notes of the chord being played;
: : there are notes that are "neighbors tones" to these essential notes; there are "inbetween" notes that fit the scale of the key
: : the song is in; there are other "inbetween" notes that are "bad" when you sustain them, but OK when you zip thru them on
: : the way to another note that is "good"; and there are "WRONG" notes.

: : WRONG notes: If the Rhythm player is playing C Major, the note C# sounds wrong if held, but sounds OK if you're playing the
: : notes D - C# - C. If you hit the C# by accident while improvising, go to D quickly, then to another note in the chord (E or G) and hold that note
: : before you go to C. This works much better then if you go from the "bad" C# directly to C. The C# was higher that the target note, so you
: : cover up by continuing higher still. If you hit a "bad" note that is lower that the target note, it can go either way, depending on taste, but you
: : need to set you own strategy for creating "escapes" like this.

: : Against a C chord, G# also sounds wrong, but note quite as wrong as C# did. Also, against a C chord, F# is "out", but still useful if you explore
: : strategies for "escaping" it.

: : Lead guitar melody is mostly played on the 4 highest strings, because high notes have "thinner" timbre" and can "ride" on top of the foundation
: : more clearly, even for non-chord tones.

: : For a rhythm player, you need to build on what you already know by learning (& learning really, really, really well), the 5 moveable chord shapes
: : for major, minor, dominant 7, major 7 and "6" (major) chords. For this purpose, stick to the key of G and start with the major chord shapes. At the
: : 3rd position (1st finger @ 3rd fret), it's the same as the top 4 notes of the G bar chord, but you DO NOT use your 1st finger the same way.
: : You use just the tip of your 1st finger to fret the 2 highest notes, then your middle & ring fingers to get the
: : next 2 lower tones (leaving your pinkie free to add notes to the cluster, if you like).

: : Next: 5th position (1st finger @ 5th fret) - this is hard to learn - you hand will rebel (actually it's the "hand" INSIDE YOUR BRAIN that balks, that needs
: : to be taught by repetition of forming a new shape). It's like the D shape in first postion, but you use different fingers because you need to use your
: : index to get the note that was "open" for the first position. Your pinkie gets a real workout here. GET USED TO IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

: : Next: 7th position (1st finger @ 7th fret) - this is another less familiar chord shape. It's like the C chord in 1st position, but you bar the top 3 strings with
: : your index finger.

: : Next: 10th postion - this is the "other" bar chord shape, but your index FINGERTIP only gets the note on the high string. You fret the other 3 noted on the 12th fret
: : however works best, but try out some "challenging" combinations to build versatility. Some guys plant their middle, ring & pinkie fingers bunched up, one per
: : string. I use myh middle & ring together (they BOTH fret the string in the middle of the group), leaving my pinkie free to add naother note.

: : Finally: 12th position - your index bars the same 3 "inner" notes that you fumbled with at the previous position and your pinkie (or ring finger) to get the
: : high note at the 15th (!) fret. You're high up the neck - nosebleed time!

: : These are the 5 "boxes" (positions) for building lead melodies over a G chord (& for songs in the Key of G major or E minor, in general).

: : These shapes ALWAYS repeat in the same order, no matter what key you are in. These are different "voicings" of the G Major chord. they each have certain
: : uses, certain strengths & liabilities. Learn to zip up & down the neck thru all 5 positions.

: : Lastly: for those chord shapes that you are slowest forming "on the fly", develop the habit of positioning the fingers that tend to want to "wait" (usually the ring &
: : pinkie fingers) before the "easy" index & middle fingers.

: : Let me know if this is useful.

: : P.S. Sustain is enhanced by finger vibrato. Finger vibrato is developed S L O W L Y, with patience, over many weeks or months.
: : If you rush developing your vibrato, you will "embed" a frantic, ineffective, "garageband" effect that will prove to be self-defeating
: : in the long term (but does have some appeal, in certain limited situations).

: : GD

Re: bass guiter chords

i would like to receive the chord charts for the bass guiter notes

Re: bass guiter chords

i dont know crap on the bass but im in lessions know.will you send me a email showing how to do your basic cords

Re: bass guiter chords

: iam just starting to play the bass guiter.will you send me a email showing how to do your basic cords

Re: bass guiter chords

 bass guiter chords

This popular thread has been given its own page : Re: bass guiter chords

Re: bass guiter chords

: i dont know crap on the bass but im in lessions know.will you send me a email showing how to do your basic cords

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