Dave Gilmour's Guitar Equipment

Dave Gilmour's Guitar Equipment

How To Gilmour-ize Your Strat, equipment technical info & images

Signal Flow
The Guitars Gilmour's main stage guitar is a USA 57 Vintage Reissue Strat fitted with EMG-SA pickups. He has also installed the EMG-EXG expander & SPC midrange presence controls. Apart from the electrics, the only other custom feature is a shortened tremolo arm so that he can keep it in his picking hand more comfortably while playing. Other guitars used live are an Esquire Telecaster in dropped D tuning for Run Like Hell, two Jensen lap steel guitars one tuned to E B E G B E for One Of These Days & the other tuned to D G D G B E for The Great Gig In The Sky. He also uses two Gibson J-200 Celebrity acoustics one tuned in standard & the other in D A D G A D for Poles Apart & a Gibson Chet Atkins Electro Classical. Both the Jensen Lap Steels & the acoustic guitars are fitted with EMG-H pickups. (These are basically a single coil pickup in a humbucker cap). Strings On the Strats Gilmour uses GHS Boomers with a customized gauge of (.010 .012 .016 .028 .038 .048) On the acoustics he uses Ernie Ball Earthwound Light's. How To Gilmour-ize Your Strat To go along with David Gilmour's taste for pristine Strat tone is his use of EMG active electronic (i.e. battery powered) pickups. Each of his Stratocasters is loaded with low impedance EMG-SA single coils, which he beefs up with two more tone modules: the EXG mid-cut/expander & SPC mid booster. As far as the SA pickups go, they have Alnico magnets which have a little more mid range than the ceramic S magnets. He also has the SPC midrange boost control on there which produces more of a singing humbucker tone. Finally, theres the EXG which David uses alot for rhythm, since it really helps define the notes, especially when there's a little distortion on and he's moving chord voicings around. The EXG works like a V configuration on a graphic EQ when you turn it up, the midrange gets cut, while the bass & treble get boosted. The SPC is where you really here the Gilmour sound emerge. Turn the SPC all the way up & you get that thick bluesy sound used in Shine On. The Analogue Footpedals
Footpedals

(A) Boss CS-2 Compression/Sustainer.

These are no longer available new from Roland. You can only purchase the CS-3 which (to my ear) does not sound as smooth as the CS-2.

(B) Pro Co. Rat II Distortion.

The first generation Rat's distortion, filter & volume knobs yield various Marshally distortion tones.

(C) Cornish Big Muff.

Pete Cornish custom Big Muff. (looks like Pete has taken an original Big Muff and housed it in a custom box). I don't know if this has been modified in any other way.

(D) Boss GE-7 Graphic Equalizer.

This GE-7 has been set to be used in conjunction with the Rat distortion pedal.

(E) Cornish Soft Sustain.

This is obviously a Pete Cornish custom effect. Notice the combination of the GE-7 graphic EQ sliders & the knobs for sustain & volume.

(F) Sovtek Big Muff II.

The Big Muff is a very heavy-vibed fuzz with volume, tone & sustain controls. The muff sounds huge & powerful despite it's feeble tone control range & is looser & more gargantuan than say a Pro Co. Rat II.

(G) Chandler Tube Driver #2.

The Tube Driver offers lots of tight girthy gain and has an openness that sets it apart from other distortion boxes. Features high/low EQ, tube drive & output controls. These later became known as Tube Works Tube Driver.

(H) MXR Dynacomp Compressor.

The Dynacomp has a natural sounding expansion & a nice bright tone to it.

(I) Ibanez CP-9 Compressor.

(J) Boss Metalizer.

No longer available new from Roland.

(K) Chandler Tube Driver #1.

The Tube Driver offers lots of tight girthy gain and has an openness that sets it apart from other distortion boxes. Features high/low EQ, tube drive & output controls. This later became known as Tube Works Tube Driver.

(L) Boss GE-7 Graphic Equalizer.

This GE-7 has been set to boost the top & bottom ranges. Labelled T&B

(M) Boss GE-7 Graphic Equalizer.

This GE-7 has been set to boost the bass ranges. Labelled BASS

(N) Boss GE-7 Graphic Equalizer.

This GE-7 has been set to boost the mid ranges. Labelled MID The Rack
With Dave Gilmour's rack system we meet a marriage of technologies, old & new. He has always exhibited a preference for older, analogue effects but has had Pete Cornish create a switching system which guarantees ease of use with optimum, low noise performance. The Rack

(A) Furman PL-8 Power Conditioner And Light Controller.

I can only guess that this controls the lights on top of the rack so Dave can see the pedals.

(B) TC. Electronics TC-2290 Dynamic Digital Delay + Effects Control Processor.

This is Dave's primary delay unit. He uses this on most songs.

(C) Uni-Vibe.

The Uni-Vibe unit featues volume & intensity controls, a chorus/vibrato switch & sepearate speed controls for the slow or fast speed options. It also requires a seperate foot switch pedal for fast or slow. Gilmour does not use the chorus option! This effect was originally a footpedal, however Gilmour had his longtime technician Phil Taylor make a rack system out of it. He even had the old logo embossed on the face plate of the new rack.

(D) Digitech IPS-33B Super Harmony Machine.

Diatonic pitch shifter.

(E) Lexicon PCM-70 Digital Effects Processor.

Dave uses the PCM-70 to store the circular delay sounds you hear in Shine On & Time. Because it has a multi tap function it can pretty accurately duplicate the kind of echo Dave used to get from his old Binson echo unit.

(F) MXR Delay System II.

This is another rack system that began life as a footpedal. Phil also added a digital readout that he says is really nowhere close to being an accurate indication of delay time.

(G) Phil Taylor Custom Rack.

This is yet another custom made rack from footpedals. It contains the following effects.

Boss CE-2 Chorus

The original chorus from Boss has rate & depth knobs & sounds sweet, rich & dynamic. There are two CE-2's loaded into this rack one is marked Mono Chorus & the other Left Chorus. (The left chorus is inserted in the signal path for the left channel of Dave's amp setup).

Electric Mistress

The Electric Mistress has rate, range & colour controls, plus a filter matrix switch. This is sort of a bizzarre sounding flanger that gets extremely detuned & twisted.

Tremulator

The Tremulator has speed and depth controls.

(H) Dynachord CL5222 Leslie Simulator.

(I) Samson UHF Dual Receiver.

(J) Peterson Strobe Tuner.

Other Effects & Equipment
There are a few footpedals & other items which are not pictured or part of Dave's current live rig but have been and still are used by him in the studio.

MXR Phase 90

This was MXR's first effect and only has a speed knob that yields complex, swirly phase textures with silky highs & lots of vocal inflection. Also does decent rotating speaker imitations at higher speeds.

Arbiter Fuzz Face

The classic of classic fuzzes sounds big, deep & bad. The Fuzz Face takes you from clean to insanity with a mere twiddle of your guitars volume knob.

Boss HM-2 Heavy Metal Distortion

An 80's classic Gilmour used on About Face (notably at the end of Murder). It delivers incredibly gutsy grind & tons of deep bass boost. Features low/high and colour mix controls.

Maestro Rover

The Maestro Rover looks like a late 1950's NASA satellite (I will try and get a scan of this thing) but it's a rotating speaker designed to go between your guitar and your amp. This sure fire attention getter has amp & instrument inputs & features volume, speed, slow & fast controls. A crossover routes the upper frequencies through the Rover's amplifier to the rotating speaker, while the lower frequencies are sent to your stage amp.

Orange Treble/Bass Boost.

Heil Voice Box

The Midi Foot Controller
This Bob Bradshaw designed pedalboard is used to select individual or different preset combinations of effects. This doesn't do the actual switching though. The left side of Dave's rack unit contains his Pete Cornish custom built switcher, which has 24 sends & returns & uses gold plated relays to turn individual effects on and off. In addition to this, it also sends standard MIDI program numbers to the various MIDI processors that are contained in his rack (such as the Lexicon). It can also send almost anything he wants to the rack, such as a delay time or whatever. I'm not sure if he uses any of these features, but it's there.

For information on a similar type of pedalboard designed by Rocktron/Bradshaw. Footboard

(A) TC. Electronics TC-2290 Digital Delay + Effects Control Processor. On/Off

(B) Lexicon PCM-70 Digital Effects Processor. On/Off

(C) Doppola's. On/Off

(D) Leslie. On/Off

(E) Left Chorus (Rack Mounted Boss CE-2). On/Off

(F) Acoustic. On/Off

This seems to be a switch Dave uses to toggle between electric & acoustic setups.

(G) Midi.

(H) Store.

(I) MXR Delay System II. On/Off

(J) Graphic B (Mid). On/Off

(K) Graphic A (Bass). On/Off

(L) Graphic C (T & B). On/Off

(M) Tremulator (Rack Mounted). On/Off

(N) Chorus (Rack Mounted Boss CE-2). On/Off

(O) Univibe. On/Off

(P) Electric Mistress. On/Off

(Q) Chandler Tube Driver #2. On/Off

(R) Sovtek Big Muff. On/Off

(S) Cornish Soft Sustain. On/Off

(T) Pro Co. Rat II. On/Off

(U) Chandler Tube Driver #1. On/Off

(V) Pete Cornish Big Muff. On/Off

(W) Hyper. On/Off

This toggles the Boss Metalizer

(X) Ibanez CP-9 Compressor. On/Off

(Y) Digitech Whammy. On/Off

(Z) Bank Switch.

Selects the bank number for preset sounds.

(1) Preset Numbers. 1/0

(2) Preset Numbers. 2

(3) Preset Numbers. 3

(4) Preset Numbers. 4

(5) MXR Dynacomp Compressor. On/Off

(6) Boss CS-2 Compressor. On/Off

(7) Doppola's. Slow/Fast

Selects which speed the doppola's rotate at.

(8) Leslie. Slow/Fast

Selects the speed of the Dynachord CL5222 Leslie Speaker Simulator.

(9) Univibe. Slow/Fast

Selects the speed of the univibe rotating speaker simulator.

(10) Ernie Ball Volume Pedal.

(11) Digitech Whammy Pedal.

FX Facts
Despite the apparent complexity of Dave Gilmour's set up, the actual contents of each track may come as something of a surprise. Essentially his sound is fairly clean, choosing different distortion units to add their characteristic sound to his signal. As an example, to reproduce the track Money from Dark Side Of The Moon live in concert, Gilmour uses this effects combination.

Main Riff: Pete Cornish Soft Sustain with Chandler Tube Driver #2.

Solo: Boss CS-2 Compressor with Chandler Tube Driver #1, Sovtek Big Muff & TC Electronics digital delay.

Solo (Dry Sound): Chandler Tube Driver #1 with Pro Co. Rat II Distortion. The Amplification

Preamp

After journeying through the rack system the signal meets an alembic F2-B bass guitar preamp. This has been modified with an extra tube, lowered output impedance & a different capacitor to help cut the low end.

Amps

Gilmour has always been a fan of Hi-Watt amps, tending to use AP-100 watt heads on stage and combo's in the studio. Live three of the heads are used as power amps & another three are used as slaves. All use Mullard E-34 valves which are desperately difficult to get a hold of these days, but Floyd head of backline Phil Taylor still has a cupboard full!

(A) Right channel output to 4x12's 1+10 8 ohm.

I am guessing that (1+10) refers to channel inputs on a mixer i.e. channel 1 left, channel 10 right.

(B) Left channel output to 4x12's 2+9 8 ohm.

Again (2+9) could be channel 2 right, channel 9 left. If this is the case then Dave could have, for instance, channels 1+2 as a stereo pair for the Marshalls & channels 9+10 as a stereo pair for the WEM's.

(C) Spare AP-100.

(D) Output to Heil Voice Box via Pete Cornish Dummy Load Box 8 ohm.

(E) Output to Doppola's 87, 88 8 ohm.

(F) Output to Doppola 89 8 ohm.

Speaker Cabinets & Doppola's

Speaker Cabinets

The right channel Hi-Watt powers a WEM 4x12 which is loaded with Fane Cresendo speakers and a Marshall loaded with Celestion speakers. A second Hi-Watt does the same thing for the left channel which also carries a chorused signal from a Boss CE-2 Chorus. (See Footpedals Incorporated Into A Rack Space). In the second rack, one AP-100 feeds the Jim Dunlop Heil Voice Box, another feeds Doppola's 87 & 88 (8 ohm) & a third feeds Doppola 89 (16 ohm).

Doppola's

These rotating speaker units were designed by Phil Taylor & Paul Leader to provide Gilmour with that 'Leslie' effect on his guitar. Leslie cabinets themselves might have seemed the obvious choice, but Gilmour was after a slightly different sound. In the studio he had been using Maestro Rover units which are revolving full range speakers but they are too low powered for live use and so the Doppola's were born. Three units are used on stage each loaded with two six inch 100 watt drivers.

(A) Marshall 4x12 cabinet with Celestion speakers.

(B) WEM 4x12 cabinet with Fane Cresendo speakers.

(C) Custom Doppola rotating speakers.

Further info/images from Webpage by Murray Browne

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

Re: a strange box??

You mean a "talk box", or?

A long plastic tube that you put in your mouth.

www.gargantuansound.com

Re: a strange box??

Do you mean the box with the tube that's mounted to the mic-stand? It's a Jim Dunlop Heil Voice Box. It's used on Keep Talking and to make the pig oinks on Pigs (Animals '77). I think it's some sort of a pre-amp used as an efx box. It sends the guitar sound through the tube (for that it needs a pre-amp) and you can mould the sound with your mouth. The downside of it is if you get spit into it (moist), the pre-amp can click and is known to have busted a few teeth, Dave's is slightly modified but I don't know how.

Free Four

I need to know what's used on the solo on the song Free Four....it's a kickass solo and my band is going to add it to our list of songs we perform, but only until I know how to match the sound...

Re: Free Four

I think he used a Fuzz Face at the time. He played on a 57 US strat and possibly a Hi-Watt amp. If you can't find a Fuzz face, you can pretty much nail the sound with a Big Muff. I use an Ibanez Tube Screamer and sometimes a Boss Blues Driver (BD-2). I use a bright setting on my amp and use an external EQ to boost the middle range. Both of the pedals are set with about 75% gain and 75% level for extra boost. That's all. Don't spoil the sound with all kinds of efx. The early Gilmour kept it VERY simple.

The Wall Live

If you like the tone Gilmour has on the Wall live then here's all you have to do to get it. I have a Marshall VS65R which is nothing like something Gilmour would use but all I do is set it to a bright clean tone with lots of midrange. I bought a brand new Big Muff U.S. reissue and a brand new Deluxe Electric Mistress Flanger. The flanger is great for all things and gives a nice tone but the Big Muff is only good in collaboration with the flanger (to me). So to get to the point, by using both of these, you can absolutely NAIL Gilmour's tone on the Wall live. It sounds like his solos on Comfortably Numb, Hey You, Mother, and all the rest. The flanger especially is fuckin awesome but both of them together make the perfect wall live sound. Email me if you get these and you want to know what I have the pedals set too. I hope you like them!!

- Chris Failla

Re: The Wall Live

Yes. The Big Muff and the Mistress is a perfect match. What's your set up? Do you place the Mistress after the Muff? What's your setting on the 3 knobs on the Mistress? Do you use any compression together with this? I'd like to get a nother fans view on this setup. Tanx.

Re: The Wall Live

I used to have more effects but I sorta narrowed it down because some weren't that useful in getting Gilmour's tone. Right now I go from my Strat - MXR Phase 90 - Electric Mistress - Big Muff (US reissue) - Cry Baby - to my amp. On the Deluxe Electric Mistress (keep in my mind this is a brand new reissue and its not vintage) I have the color knob set at 1:30, the range knob set at 12:00, and the rate knob set at 9:00. This seems to be good for an all around cool tone, even when I am playing without the Big Muff on a clean channel. The mistress also sounds good when playing Brain Damage/Eclipse. I have my Big Muff's volume set at 9:00, tone at 1:30, and sustain all the way up. With the Phase 90, I usually have it set at 9:00 which is good for lots of Floyd songs like Shine On, Breathe, Have a Cigar, but if I want to do Any Colour You Like, I set it to 3:00 and It sounds almost perfect to how it sounded on Dark Side. I was told Gilmour used a Univibe (which is basically just a phase shifter and not really a rotating speaker simulator). As far as I am concerned, you don't need the Univibe for anything Gilmourish. I don't think he used it much at all and It's really expensive. I tried one of those univibes out and I thought it sounded like shit and it was extremely stupid. You are really better off with the MXR Phase 90 which will cover more songs for you. I know Eddie Van Halen used one too along with many others. The pedal I use the least is probably my Cry Baby. I only use it if I am playing someone elses song and they used it. Like Jimi Hendrix or stuff like that. I know Gilmour had one but he didn't really use it much either. It's just a rule of thumb that everyone has to own a Wah in their setup, lol. That's about it as far as my effects and setup goes. I always use the bridge pickup on my guitar (for Gilmour). I installed a DiMarzio Fast Track 2 stacked humbucking pickup (humbucker in the size of a single coil) and I love it. You have no more 60 cycle hum and it sounds good to pull of Gilmour. This is a much better way to go as opposed to buying the EMG's. All you really need is a humbucker in the bridge and you are set. I have a Marshall VS65R and if you are interested in knowing what I set it too, you can just post another message or email me and I'd be more than happy to tell you. If anyone else wants to post messages about their setups and effect settings, feel free to do so. It would be interested in reading how others have things setup. Thanx!

- Chris Failla

Re: The Wall Live

To all Electric Mistress and MXR Phase 90 owners -

I currently own the MXR Phase 90, and I'm now interested in getting the Electric Mistress after reading this post (especially because I already have a Big Muff Pi).

My question to you guys is the following - how much of an overlap do you think the EM is with the Phase90? I tend to think that phasers and flangers are somewhat similar, and I was wondering if there was a better place to invest my money than to have both the EM and the Phase90. Are these two pedals very distinct and indepedently useful enough to justify owning both? Or would I get the most of the benefit of both pedals just by owning one of them?

Thanks

: I used to have more effects but I sorta narrowed it down because some weren't that useful in getting Gilmour's tone. Right now I go from my Strat - MXR Phase 90 - Electric Mistress - Big Muff (US reissue) - Cry Baby - to my amp. On the Deluxe Electric Mistress (keep in my mind this is a brand new reissue and its not vintage) I have the color knob set at 1:30, the range knob set at 12:00, and the rate knob set at 9:00. This seems to be good for an all around cool tone, even when I am playing without the Big Muff on a clean channel. The mistress also sounds good when playing Brain Damage/Eclipse. I have my Big Muff's volume set at 9:00, tone at 1:30, and sustain all the way up. With the Phase 90, I usually have it set at 9:00 which is good for lots of Floyd songs like Shine On, Breathe, Have a Cigar, but if I want to do Any Colour You Like, I set it to 3:00 and It sounds almost perfect to how it sounded on Dark Side. I was told Gilmour used a Univibe (which is basically just a phase shifter and not really a rotating speaker simulator). As far as I am concerned, you don't need the Univibe for anything Gilmourish. I don't think he used it much at all and It's really expensive. I tried one of those univibes out and I thought it sounded like shit and it was extremely stupid. You are really better off with the MXR Phase 90 which will cover more songs for you. I know Eddie Van Halen used one too along with many others. The pedal I use the least is probably my Cry Baby. I only use it if I am playing someone elses song and they used it. Like Jimi Hendrix or stuff like that. I know Gilmour had one but he didn't really use it much either. It's just a rule of thumb that everyone has to own a Wah in their setup, lol. That's about it as far as my effects and setup goes. I always use the bridge pickup on my guitar (for Gilmour). I installed a DiMarzio Fast Track 2 stacked humbucking pickup (humbucker in the size of a single coil) and I love it. You have no more 60 cycle hum and it sounds good to pull of Gilmour. This is a much better way to go as opposed to buying the EMG's. All you really need is a humbucker in the bridge and you are set. I have a Marshall VS65R and if you are interested in knowing what I set it too, you can just post another message or email me and I'd be more than happy to tell you. If anyone else wants to post messages about their setups and effect settings, feel free to do so. It would be interested in reading how others have things setup. Thanx!

: - Chris Failla

Electric Mistress (The Wall Live)

Sorry I am a little bit late on posting this followup. See I thought the same thing with the Phase 90 and Electric Mistress. I thought flangers and phasers were sort of on the same step of the ladder. It sure as hell wasnt the case with the Electric Mistress. This pedal is really sweet sounding. It is indeed a flanger but it does have a really nice chorusy sound to it also. I leave it at the same setting at all time and I believe I posted in a few messages back that I have my color set to 1:30, I made a mistake. My color and range are both set to 12:00 and my rate is set at 9:00. To me, this is an all around good setting. I never change from those settings. Sometimes I'll even run just the Electric Mistress through the my effects loop and it sounds a little bit different and a little quiter. This way it sounds great on a clean tone when you use your neck/mid position pickups on a strat. This isn't exactly a way to emulate Gilmour by doing this but it sure gives you a pretty nice tone. You can also run the EM through the loop and have distortion on and it sounds really nice there too, but it doesnt sound the same when running it through the front of the amp with the Big Muff. When you do that, you have almost an exact duplicate of The Wall Live (Is there anybody out there?) I highly reccomend the EM and you can buy it at www.musiciansfriend.com for about $150. Thats where I bought mine and I chose the cheapest shipping and it came with in a week. Good luck!!!

Re: The Wall Live

A phaser and a flanger is two different efx. I'm not sure of the technical side, but I believe they are made out of reverb in a way. A phaser is quite similar to a Leslie (rotating speaker). It provides a warm, fat sound and and the MXR 90 has one rate knob. Gilmour started to use phaser in 72 (eclipse tour) i guess, and it can easily be heard on Breathe and Have a Cigar. A flanger, is a shimmery, swirling sound. The Mistress is the best flanger I've heard and has been Dave's choise since he started to use it in 77. Check out the solo on Mother on the Is there anybody out there? album. These two efx are important to nail the Gilmour sound and you should get both. You can't compare them. You won't be disapointed!

creating gilmours sound

recreating gilmours sound is like fighyting an army of 100 by yourself. u cant do it. its the feel.impossible to re-create. ive got a mex strat and a rp7-valve effects pedal with a peavey cab. to obtain a similar sound(thats all u can do)on his solos, i put the amps distortion on about 5 and crank the pedal distortion, add chorus or whatevr the song calls for, compression, eq'[s on 7, and play my fuckin ass off. and anyone will tell u, i can imitate dave with absolut perfection

Re: creating gilmours sound

Its quite possable to get near to his sound, but you must remember the majority of his style is in his
fingers, not his effects. I personally play through a Mex strat, EMG DG20, CS-2, Rat 2, Big Muff, MXR Phaser,
and DD-5, ran into 2 seperate amps to give stereo. I also am getting a hiwatt in the next month or so.
With this I can basicly hit Shine On You Crazy Diamond, and Coming Back To Life. I can do his clean great
but gilmour often uses the electric mistress in conjunction with the big muff, therefore comfortably numb is similiar but not there
I have already invested over 1000$ in just imitating Gilmour, only to find its not just the effects. And I have spent
countless nights playing to myself trying to gain his style of playing, where his fingers are located, how he does his
vibrato, etc. Gilmour once said having the best equipment helps, but its not neccesary...

: recreating gilmours sound is like fighyting an army of 100 by yourself. u cant do it. its the feel.impossible to re-create. ive got a mex strat and a rp7-valve effects pedal with a peavey cab. to obtain a similar sound(thats all u can do)on his solos, i put the amps distortion on about 5 and crank the pedal distortion, add chorus or whatevr the song calls for, compression, eq'[s on 7, and play my fuckin ass off. and anyone will tell u, i can imitate dave with absolut perfection

Re: creating gilmours sound

I agree with mr. Floyd. You can spend 1000 of $ on the right equipement and still be totally lost. It's 90% in his fingers. Listen to old bootlegs from the early 70ies or Pompeii. Very simple. Just a fuzz and some delay, but it's Gilmour allright. Even at the Cavern gig last year with McCartney he made No Other Baby sound like Floyd using just his beaten Tele and a Fender Twin. Remember the basics: your thumb should be all around the neck and allways use 3 fingers while bending a string. Use the tremolo with care and for sustain, not jerk it off like you're in metal band and do everything 3 times slower than you feel is right. Gilmour is extremely slow. Tons of feeling. You should also use a bright setting on your amp and allways use new strings for that extra crispy sound. Enjoy!

Re: creating gilmours sound

I agree, although I did learn Gilmour usually places his fingers towards the end of the fret when he places
his fingers down
ie
|--------------*--|
|--------------*--|
^ ^
Fret 6 Fret 7

where the star is, is where he puts his fingers, this gives a slight sharper
tone and a tiny bit more bite to it, I have watched PULSE in slow motion
a bunch of times to figure this out, and find it to be true.

: I agree with mr. Floyd. You can spend 1000 of $ on the right equipement and still be totally lost. It's 90% in his fingers. Listen to old bootlegs from the early 70ies or Pompeii. Very simple. Just a fuzz and some delay, but it's Gilmour allright. Even at the Cavern gig last year with McCartney he made No Other Baby sound like Floyd using just his beaten Tele and a Fender Twin. Remember the basics: your thumb should be all around the neck and allways use 3 fingers while bending a string. Use the tremolo with care and for sustain, not jerk it off like you're in metal band and do everything 3 times slower than you feel is right. Gilmour is extremely slow. Tons of feeling. You should also use a bright setting on your amp and allways use new strings for that extra crispy sound. Enjoy!

Gilmour's humbucking strat!!!

I know this guy that works at the local music store and he seen Floyd in 1973 during the Dark Side tour. He had binoculars and he seen Gilmour playing a black strat with a maple neck and fretboard (just like the on in pompeii) BUT it had a Gibson steel plated humbucker cut into the bridge position. Does anyone know anything about this or have pictures of Gilmour with this guitar. If so, please post a message or email me. Thank you very much!!

- Chris Failla

Re: Gilmour's humbucking strat!!!

Hmm, well gilmour had this strat, I think late 60's strat, right before CBS period, or in the middle of the phase I believe.
During that time he would try alot of stuff, he tried rosewood fretbaord, locking tremelo system, etc...So its very possable he was just trying
something out, or perhaps it was a different guitar, he is a very big guitar collector, and uses various ones, including les pauls, gibsons, strats,
telecasters, esquires, and various older guitars...so its anyones guess really

: I know this guy that works at the local music store and he seen Floyd in 1973 during the Dark Side tour. He had binoculars and he seen Gilmour playing a black strat with a maple neck and fretboard (just like the on in pompeii) BUT it had a Gibson steel plated humbucker cut into the bridge position. Does anyone know anything about this or have pictures of Gilmour with this guitar. If so, please post a message or email me. Thank you very much!!

: - Chris Failla

Ampeg Tube Amp

My friend has an Ampeg j-12r Jet II Tube amp. I havent actually heard it in a while, but from what I remember, it sounds really nice. There is only one problem, when you turn the volume past 5, it crackles. He doesnt know why its doing it cuz it never used to. Do you think that it needs tubes or a new speaker and how much does it cost to replace that kind of stuff? I told him I was looking for a tube amp and he said he would sell it to me for 100 bucks but I want to wait until I know what is wrong, and how much it'll cost me to get it repaired. If anyone has any idea, please let me know. Thank you so much!!!

- Chris Failla

New amp?

Seeing as how it's my first post, just want to thank everyone that contributes. This site is amazing ;) I've been playing guitar for about 5 years now, and I'm nowhere as good as I should be but I'm hoping that be really learning Floyd songs I'll be able to get some actual technique :) But my question mainly concerns amps. I'm playing with a Marshall Valvestate 8080 (80 watt combo amp, just one tube for the gain channel that I don't use). Seeing as how I don't have that much money, does any recommend any amps that are pretty inexpensive but still sound great. Also, how much do tubes really affect the sound? Thanks everyone!

Re: New amp?

The main effect that tubes have on the sound is that you can turn the clean channel of a tube amp up and as it gets louder it starts to overdrive as the volume knob goes over halfway the overdrive increases and you start getting some compression. This is a very nice sound. If you try doing that with the clean channel of a solid state amp, as soon as it starts to overdrive/distort it just sounds horrible, non musical.

Jazz musicians who use a purely clean sound often use solid state amps because they just need a nice clean sound which solid states do quite well.

: Seeing as how it's my first post, just want to thank everyone that contributes. This site is amazing ;) I've been playing guitar for about 5 years now, and I'm nowhere as good as I should be but I'm hoping that be really learning Floyd songs I'll be able to get some actual technique :) But my question mainly concerns amps. I'm playing with a Marshall Valvestate 8080 (80 watt combo amp, just one tube for the gain channel that I don't use). Seeing as how I don't have that much money, does any recommend any amps that are pretty inexpensive but still sound great. Also, how much do tubes really affect the sound? Thanks everyone!

Re: New amp?

I hear the selmer treble and bass is a nice tube amp, I think it only 50 watts, but gilmour and barrett used
them in the early years, there only about 150$ if you look on the internet

Floyd

: The main effect that tubes have on the sound is that you can turn the clean channel of a tube amp up and as it gets louder it starts to overdrive as the volume knob goes over halfway the overdrive increases and you start getting some compression. This is a very nice sound. If you try doing that with the clean channel of a solid state amp, as soon as it starts to overdrive/distort it just sounds horrible, non musical.

: Jazz musicians who use a purely clean sound often use solid state amps because they just need a nice clean sound which solid states do quite well.

:
: : Seeing as how it's my first post, just want to thank everyone that contributes. This site is amazing ;) I've been playing guitar for about 5 years now, and I'm nowhere as good as I should be but I'm hoping that be really learning Floyd songs I'll be able to get some actual technique :) But my question mainly concerns amps. I'm playing with a Marshall Valvestate 8080 (80 watt combo amp, just one tube for the gain channel that I don't use). Seeing as how I don't have that much money, does any recommend any amps that are pretty inexpensive but still sound great. Also, how much do tubes really affect the sound? Thanks everyone!

Artificial Harmonic

Anyone know how Gilmour (and many others for that matter) can make their artificial harmonics so loud, distinct, and sustained - like for example the first note in the 2nd solo in Comf Numb?

I was never much of a A.H. guy, but my understanding is that you must strike the string with the pick and thumb almost simultaneously. And yes, I do get the sound, but it's a measly little *clink*. Is this something to do with technique, or more to do with effects and sound settings? Any suggestions will be greatly appreciated because I've been grueling over this issue for years. Thanks.

Re: Artificial Harmonic

Hey, I would think of pinching, another term for artificial harmonic, more as something that just comes with time. When I do this though, I hold my pick with my thumb on one side and my index and middle finger on the other side. I generally hold the pick pretty close to the bottom and when pinching, my thumb has to be almost level with the bottom end of the pick. It's just something you have to get used to. Try pinching up and down a string, perhaps the G string. Like start from the bridge and go to the neck pickup and back and forth while pinching. It's a technique that may help. Try it out!!

- Chris Failla

Re: Artificial Harmonic

Yes... I do get the correct sound, it's just that the loudness of my pinching sound is less than 1/3 of that of a regular note, whereas Gilmour and others, notably Zakk Wylde for example, can get their pinching sound even louder than playing a normal note. What I would like to achieve is this loud, piercing kind of pinched note. Would you say this aspect is something that also comes with practice?

I am inclined to think that effects would play at least a partial role. Would you know of any particular rules of thumb regarding sound setting (treble, bass, distortion, chorus, etc) that would help enhance the pinch?

Also, on a more purely technical note, do people generally rehold (adjust) their pick everytime they go from pinched to regular note and vice versa? That's what I do now, and it's quite a drag...

Thanks for you inputs.

: Hey, I would think of pinching, another term for artificial harmonic, more as something that just comes with time. When I do this though, I hold my pick with my thumb on one side and my index and middle finger on the other side. I generally hold the pick pretty close to the bottom and when pinching, my thumb has to be almost level with the bottom end of the pick. It's just something you have to get used to. Try pinching up and down a string, perhaps the G string. Like start from the bridge and go to the neck pickup and back and forth while pinching. It's a technique that may help. Try it out!!

: - Chris Failla

Re: Artificial Harmonic

I think the key to it is where along the string you strike it. As with a natural harmonic you get the strongest result with the 12th fret producing a harmonic 1 octave higher than the open string, with an artificial harmonic you get good results by picking halfway between the fretted note and the bridge, this produces a strong harmonic 1 octave higher than the fretted note, experiment with picking at different places along the string to get different harmonics.

: Yes... I do get the correct sound, it's just that the loudness of my pinching sound is less than 1/3 of that of a regular note, whereas Gilmour and others, notably Zakk Wylde for example, can get their pinching sound even louder than playing a normal note. What I would like to achieve is this loud, piercing kind of pinched note. Would you say this aspect is something that also comes with practice?

: I am inclined to think that effects would play at least a partial role. Would you know of any particular rules of thumb regarding sound setting (treble, bass, distortion, chorus, etc) that would help enhance the pinch?

: Also, on a more purely technical note, do people generally rehold (adjust) their pick everytime they go from pinched to regular note and vice versa? That's what I do now, and it's quite a drag...

: Thanks for you inputs.

:

: : Hey, I would think of pinching, another term for artificial harmonic, more as something that just comes with time. When I do this though, I hold my pick with my thumb on one side and my index and middle finger on the other side. I generally hold the pick pretty close to the bottom and when pinching, my thumb has to be almost level with the bottom end of the pick. It's just something you have to get used to. Try pinching up and down a string, perhaps the G string. Like start from the bridge and go to the neck pickup and back and forth while pinching. It's a technique that may help. Try it out!!

: : - Chris Failla

Re: Artificial Harmonic

No, I definetly do not reposition my fingers when I am ready to pinch. I hold the pick low even when I am not pinching. I just sorta shift my thumb when I pinch, it's just something you get used to. I don't even think about it so to be honest with you, I didnt even realize what I was doing until you mentioned and then I payed closer attention, lol. I would say effects has nothing to do with the sound of a pinch but, when you have your gain or distortion turned up, pinching is a lot easier, louder, and has a longer sustain. It's just something that comes with time....

- Chris Failla

a big white thing???

On pix of Dave from around 73'-'74, you can see a fairly large white box in his live rack. He has this thing on a small table with tube legs just beside him. I also seen him using this backstage. Is this the EMS guitar-synth used on On the run?

Re: a big white thing???

yes it is

: On pix of Dave from around 73'-'74, you can see a fairly large white box in his live rack. He has this thing on a small table with tube legs just beside him. I also seen him using this backstage. Is this the EMS guitar-synth used on On the run?

Big Muff

Has anyone A/B the russian and USA big muff? Is there any diffrence in the sound or anything? I the USA worth the extra bucks? And does it run on a output jack?

Black Strat

Does anyone know what model of a Dimarzio pickup Gilmour put in the bridge position of his black strat around 1977? Also, where did Gilmour get the black pickguard with the single ply black? If anyone knows anything about this please post a message. Thank you!

Re: Black Strat

: Does anyone know what model of a Dimarzio pickup Gilmour put in the bridge position of his black strat around 1977? Also, where did Gilmour get the black pickguard with the single ply black? If anyone knows anything about this please post a message. Thank you!
::: FS 1 Dimarzio- and for the black pguard ,I m looking for the same thing, and" All Parts" has in its catalog a single 1 ply black vintage 8 hole. But If you take a look at the black david strat ,it has not 8 holes,it seems to me 10 holes.The standard strats have 11 holes.Another source his WD music products where they have both.But I have not still ordered because I m not sure what kind of material it is.If you realize somethings mail on my lail and let me know thx steve

Re: Black Strat

He used a Dimarzio FS-1 on his black Strat bridge position. On the majority of Pink Floyd songs, he uses the bridge pickup but on some songs he uses the neck pickup, such as Shine On, Another Brick... pt.2 and (even though I only know of one instance of this) Wish You Were Here. Also the black Strat wasn't stolen after the Wall tour as he used it at Live 8.

: Does anyone know what model of a Dimarzio pickup Gilmour put in the bridge position of his black strat around 1977? Also, where did Gilmour get the black pickguard with the single ply black? If anyone knows anything about this please post a message. Thank you!

Re: Black Strat

To my surprise, I carefully observed lots of pictures of Gilmour from the Wall shows in 80-81. He used a Black Strat with black pickguard and maple fretboard in this era. I know that Gilmour uses the bridge (treble) pickup for generally everything but a saw that in quite a few pictures, he was using the neck pickup. I was wondering what songs he used a neck pickup on. Please post any info you may have. Thank you.

Re: Black Strat

I guess he got that guitar for the The Wall tour. Haven't seen it on earlier pix. I believe it got stolen shortly after the tour or on the tour. Dave's using the bridge pic up for most songs, but you can hear the neck pic up on Another brick 2, both for the rythm and solo. The fat solo on Mother (Is there anybody...CD) also sounds like a bridge, I' m not sure. He also uses the neck pic up on Shine on (live version), Any colour (pulse) and dogs of war (delicate). It is easy to get fooled by his fat sound, but he's using a lot of EQ and feeds his guitar through a bass guitar amp to get his live rig more powerful. The EMG pic ups are also boosting the sound of a normally thin bridge pic up. If someone think this is totally wrong, please correct me!

Re: Black Strat

Not sure about what model of pickup, or the pickguard, wasn't sure of much
of a difference. Generally you use the neck pickup with distortion, I'd assume
he uses it a bit com num, hey you, young lust, etc

: To my surprise, I carefully observed lots of pictures of Gilmour from the Wall shows in 80-81. He used a Black Strat with black pickguard and maple fretboard in this era. I know that Gilmour uses the bridge (treble) pickup for generally everything but a saw that in quite a few pictures, he was using the neck pickup. I was wondering what songs he used a neck pickup on. Please post any info you may have. Thank you.

As good as Riis...

Hey there! I vould just like to say that I've had the pleasure of seeing and hearing Mr. Riis, or Gilmourish as I like to call him on Smuget a couple of times. It's fantastic to see how he plays the different floyd tunes. It's just like being to a floyd concert. I wish I was as good as Riis...

As good as Riis...

Hey there! I vould just like to say that I've had the pleasure of seeing and hearing Mr. Riis, or Gilmourish as I like to call him on Smuget a couple of times. It's fantastic to see how he plays the different floyd tunes. It's just like being to a floyd concert. I wish I was as good as Riis...

Dynachord amp..

Hey.. I recently purchaced an old Dynachord "Hi-Fi favorite II" valve amplifier... it is imaculate and sounds soooo sweet.....

I cant find any info on this amp and am surching hard.... it has two individual channels.... one with a tremelo effect... possibly rotating spkr emmulator....

please help if you can... this amp is beautiful... but I am unshure of the manufacturing period??

RIch.

Re: Dynachord amp..

This is a German amp called DYNACORD from 70s and was used for PA and home use not Hi Fi. Tremelo was a very popular effect in thoses days , still is.

This is defintily NOT rotary speaker "emulator" There were no emulators in thos days only real gear.

www.gargantuansound.com

Electrical Engineers/ Guitar Techs...

In referance to the Unappealing loudness of the Boss CS-2/CS-3...There has to be someway of tweeking it so its not so darn loud. I tend to have the sustain on like 1 o'clock or 2. and its really too loud. There has to be a way to open it up and do something, maybe add a resistor or soder something...god knows i dont have the knowlege, but one of you might. Come on Guitar techs...spill your guts...keep us regulars to this page updated. rock on! -mark

Re: Electrical Engineers/ Guitar Techs...

what do you mean by too loud? gain or volume?

: In referance to the Unappealing loudness of the Boss CS-2/CS-3...There has to be someway of tweeking it so its not so darn loud. I tend to have the sustain on like 1 o'clock or 2. and its really too loud. There has to be a way to open it up and do something, maybe add a resistor or soder something...god knows i dont have the knowlege, but one of you might. Come on Guitar techs...spill your guts...keep us regulars to this page updated. rock on! -mark

Re: Electrical Engineers/ Guitar Techs...

I mean when iam playing in my house late at night when i come home, I dont play too loud. So when i turn the cs-3 on it has this hiss that really sucks. Especially when i turn the sustain at about 2 o'clock and volume: 12, Tone: 12 Attack: all the way....btw what the hell does attack even do? I would hate to get a cs-2 because i dont know where they have been...they have been around so long...It prob. took some abuse from the seller. -mark
: what do you mean by too loud? gain or volume?

:
: : In referance to the Unappealing loudness of the Boss CS-2/CS-3...There has to be someway of tweeking it so its not so darn loud. I tend to have the sustain on like 1 o'clock or 2. and its really too loud. There has to be a way to open it up and do something, maybe add a resistor or soder something...god knows i dont have the knowlege, but one of you might. Come on Guitar techs...spill your guts...keep us regulars to this page updated. rock on! -mark

Re: Electrical Engineers/ Guitar Techs...

He means when you have distortion on, the CS-3 sounds really shitty cuz it hums and makes tons of unwanted noise.

Re: Electrical Engineers/ Guitar Techs...

It has a lot of background noise because it's a compressor, and part of a compressors function is to boost the low level sounds and attenuate the louder sounds. This raises the overall background noise level, when using distortion as well it can get a bit overbearing.

Solutions? Get humbucking pickups or silent single coils (this is where the noise is orginating from), or get a noise gate, or don't use so much gain in your distortion pedals, or put up with it.

: He means when you have distortion on, the CS-3 sounds really shitty cuz it hums and makes tons of unwanted noise.

Re: Electrical Engineers/ Guitar Techs...

I'd agree with Skogstad, also try keeping the level down on it, and have the distortion volume bumped up
I use a CS-2 and love it, but I rarely turn sustain passed 3, and level passed 2, unless I am playing shine on

Attack I think is how fast or hard it compresses the note being played, I find when I turn it all the way up it
tends to be more "pick-y" and kind of can hear the click of the pick against the string, versus not, I am not really
sure what it does tho, so I just keep it at about 11 o'clock

: It has a lot of background noise because it's a compressor, and part of a compressors function is to boost the low level sounds and attenuate the louder sounds. This raises the overall background noise level, when using distortion as well it can get a bit overbearing.

: Solutions? Get humbucking pickups or silent single coils (this is where the noise is orginating from), or get a noise gate, or don't use so much gain in your distortion pedals, or put up with it.

: : He means when you have distortion on, the CS-3 sounds really shitty cuz it hums and makes tons of unwanted noise.

fanin D57 dreadnaught

I am in need of info on this guitar. Its a jap import of the late 70's early 80's it has a spruce top rosewood sides 2pc rosewood back ebony fretboard maple neck with steel reinforcement very fine finish nice action looks like a martin D-45 any clues???????
rick :plstktnkr2@yahoo.com

Tweaking Strat/Big Muff

I have a Big Muff and I like it a lot. It is a USA reissue version. The pedal is pretty noisy though. That is the only drawback. Does anyone know how to shield it or do something with the wiring instead to reduce the noise it gives out? Also, I've read that Gilmour did something with his Strat around the Animals/Wall era that supposedly got rid of some single coil noise. Something that had to do with shielding or something to that effect. Does anyone know anything about this either? I'd appreciate your help if you can give it to me. Thank you!!

Re: Tweaking Strat/Big Muff

Just applied shielding to the strat. Try gluiing aluminium foil to the back of the pickguard, and if you are
capable, get some shileding paint and paint the inside of the guitar, I believe he did that, but with the EMG's
I don't have that problem very much...the loudness of the muff is its primary characteristic, as are with alot of EH pedals/

: I have a Big Muff and I like it a lot. It is a USA reissue version. The pedal is pretty noisy though. That is the only drawback. Does anyone know how to shield it or do something with the wiring instead to reduce the noise it gives out? Also, I've read that Gilmour did something with his Strat around the Animals/Wall era that supposedly got rid of some single coil noise. Something that had to do with shielding or something to that effect. Does anyone know anything about this either? I'd appreciate your help if you can give it to me. Thank you!!

whoa! Thank you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I would like to thank all of you who provided me with the information on the screeming sounds on Echoes! My wha wha has gotten new life!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Re: whoa! Thank you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

no problem

: I would like to thank all of you who provided me with the information on the screeming sounds on Echoes! My wha wha has gotten new life!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Re: whoa! Thank you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Neat sound isn't it?

: no problem

: : I would like to thank all of you who provided me with the information on the screeming sounds on Echoes! My wha wha has gotten new life!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Post new comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions. Do not include any spaces in your answer.
Image CAPTCHA
Copy the characters (respecting upper/lower case) from the image.

Contact | Advertise | Contents | Privacy Policy | Forum

This site is published by Hitsquad Pty Ltd. Copyright © 1999 - 2017 , All Rights Reserved.