Matsuoka classical

Posted by Barry Parker on Tue, 05/06/03 - 16:32:38.

Classical Guitar by Ryoji Matsuoka. any knowledge of these guitars? good, average, fine quality? i am not familiar with the luthier. please advise.

thanks in advance,
Barry

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Re: Matsuoka classical

I also have a classical Matsuoka guitar. I have found conflicting information on them. I found information about a Matsuoka production line guitar, a good quality but not unique. I believe that Ryoji Matsuoka hand-made guitars in the 70's, then allowed his name to be used for a line of Aria guitars or something of the sort. If you have a handmade one, I believe they can be worth a good deal of money. I think guitars are still being made with the Ryoji Matsuoka name, sold in Japan. I think they are fairly good quality. There just isn't a lot of information out there about them, but all the comments by owners I found about them seems to reflect a consensus -- they are much loved by their owners.
The label in mine says it's a Model 100 (but not M100), serial number 7419. It's stamped with Matsoka's signature, but I'm not sure what the serial number or model number means. My dad bought it in the late 70's or early 80's for $600. It's in mint condition and the sound is absolutely enchanting -- warm, full, loud like a Spanish guitar. I'd love to know more about my guitar, too.
If you find anything, please e-mail me at
christinewessel AT ucsbalum DOT net (replace the AT with an @ and DOT with a .)
Thanks
Christine

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matsuoka Classical

I have a matsuoka classical guitar that has on its label Luthier Roji Matusoka and the model number says M65P and followed by a set of numbers 00100960 and label says made in japan. I can't seem to find anything about this Guitar. It does have electronics- PR 500 na DUKER. I got this from a friend selling it supposed to be brand new from Japan in the lat 1990's. Can someone give me an idea on the history of they guitar? I mean its type of wood and it's cost if at all possible. It sounds great.

M40 Matsuoka classical guitar

I've bought my Ryoji Matsuoka M40 classical guitar as a second hand instrument in 1985, in Paris (France). It was - or it looked - brand new, but maybe it wasn't. I still have it today and I really like its beautiful sound. And it's so easy to play ! How much did I pay for it ? As far as I can remember, I got it for 1 500 or 2000 FF (french francs at that time, 17 years before €), which means about 350 US$ or 400 US$. There's no serial number on the stamp, but the signature of Matsuoka appears clearly.

Ryoji Matsuoka Luthier M 12

I found my Matsuoka used, about 15 years ago, for $175. Very nice classical guitar - good tone, great action, sounds very nice indeed with LaBella 413 Studio Professional strings. The guitar has never had any problems - well built, anmd the matte finish avoids the micro-scratching the mars so many instruments. The label shows the model as a M 12, no serial number. The signature stamp is there...

Re: Matsuoka classical

i have a ryoji Matsioka Luthier classical guitar and im not sure about the model. the brand label has no model in it. how can i get the correct details of my guitar. if needed i can upload a pictures of it.

Re: Matsuoka classical

Like a fool, I took the label out of my RM shortly after purchasing it in San Francisco in 1975 from a music store a door or two down from the Bud's Ice Cream shop near USF. Anyway, over 30 years later, and one bridge re-attachment, my RM classical sounds as good as many Ramirez models. It's full, warm, outstanding projection, etc. It looks almost exactly like a Ramirez, too, only the quality isn't the same, obviously. Still, for the price and the way it has matured and endured, my RM is some of the wisest money I've ever spent. Had it wired recently with a Fishman setup, and it didn't hurt the sound one bit. I love my RM! Just wish I would've left the label in it, is all.

: I also have a classical Matsuoka guitar. I have found conflicting information on them. I found information about a Matsuoka production line guitar, a good quality but not unique. I believe that Ryoji Matsuoka hand-made guitars in the 70's, then allowed his name to be used for a line of Aria guitars or something of the sort. If you have a handmade one, I believe they can be worth a good deal of money. I think guitars are still being made with the Ryoji Matsuoka name, sold in Japan. I think they are fairly good quality. There just isn't a lot of information out there about them, but all the comments by owners I found about them seems to reflect a consensus -- they are much loved by their owners.
: The label in mine says it's a Model 100 (but not M100), serial number 7419. It's stamped with Matsoka's signature, but I'm not sure what the serial number or model number means. My dad bought it in the late 70's or early 80's for $600. It's in mint condition and the sound is absolutely enchanting -- warm, full, loud like a Spanish guitar. I'd love to know more about my guitar, too.
: If you find anything, please e-mail me at
: christinewessel AT ucsbalum DOT net (replace the AT with an @ and DOT with a .)
: Thanks
: Christine

how much is the orignal price of ryoji matsuoka m40

how much is the orignal price of ryoji matsuoka m40

Re: how much is the orignal price of ryoji matsuoka m40

Hello- I bought my Ryoji Matsuoka #40 new in 1974 for $350 U.S. dollars (USD). Saw a used 1970's #40 in Kyoto four years ago that was priced at $240 USD. Last year, I bought a used #30 for $175 USD. This year (2007) I saw a used #20 priced at $250.

Ryoji Matsuoka classical Model 2861

This one has a gorgeous matched rosewood back with beautiful eyes and colour in the grain, and matched sides as well in rosewood. The neck is a 5? part mahogany lamination. Model number is 2861 handwritten, but no serial number.

Nothing so far on the net. I bought it used in the 90s with no history. It's mint with a gorgeous case.

Anyone have any information on this guitar? Thanks
Joseph

Re: Ryoji Matsuoka classical Model #30

hello- bought a used one for $175 USD last year. condition is excellent, but it's not one of matsuoka's better models. prices in japan are still around $240 - 350 USD for used models in good condition.

Re: Matsuoka classical

In response to Christine's message:
I owned a Matsuoka #40 classical, purchased new in 1976 for $350. Learned about them via a friend, whose father bought a new Matsuoka #60 in Okinawa for $300 USD at a military comissary around the same period. At that time, the Japanese Yen was about 350 to the dollar.
As far as I know, Matsuoka's were not handmade, but a good factory produced instrument. They were Japan's challenge to the Spanish low- medium priced guitar market and were successful.
Have never heard of Matsuoka guitars being afiliated with Aria guitars, but per writer Tony Bacon, Shiro Arai (Aria) brought famous Spanish classical guitars to Japan and copied their contruction, etc. I own two old Aria classicals which look like copies of Fleta and Ramirez classicals. I paid less than $250 for each one in the last two years (2005 - 2006).
Also saw new Matsuoka guitars while I was in Kyoto two years ago. Model #80 was selling for about $800 - $1,000 USD, with higher numbered models increasing in price. They were well made, but unexceptional in sound. They had average sounding basses and tinny trebles.
As to whether used Matsuoka's are worth quite a bit, that's up to you. In Kyoto, I saw used Matsuoka #40 and #60 guitars (good condition)for $200 - $300 USD. This year, I communicated with a store in Tokyo that was selling a more recent (used) model Matsuoka model #50 for $260.
I think Matsuoka guitars are excellent period pieces. But collector's items are only worth what a buyer is willing to pay.

Re: Matsuoka classical

Hello again- I purchased a 1979 Matsuoka #30 this year (2006) for $175.
It matched another #30 advertised on e-bay, along w/ the same rosette pattern. Boomy, full basses but the trebles are thin. Right hand tasto/ponticello sounds are o.k., but unremarkable. Was in New Zealand two weeks ago and saw old Japanese classical guitars for ridiculous prices. The vendors were silent when I told them the price I paid for the Matsuoka #30.

Re: Matsuoka classical

I have owned a Matsuoka classical guitar since the about 1973-75. There is very little information on the lable.
It says " RYOJO MATUSOKA - Luthier.
There is nothing where it says Model No. but for the serial number it says 60 - Thats all it says.
It appears to be solid rosewood back and sides and the top is solid spruce, perhaps cedar.
I paid about $300.00 dollars for it in the early seventies.
It has a huge amount of projection.
Does anyone have any idea how much it could be worth.
Ron

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Matsuoka guitar

I bought my #40 in 1973, the same year it was manufactured, in a music shop in Tokyo. It was hard to hear the guitar because the store was playing loud background music. I bought the guitar anyway, and have never regretted it. It is well made. The interior is smooth and all the construction lines are clean. My only complaint is about the laminated top which has cracked over the years and which scratches somewhat easily. Otherwise, I love my guitar. It has great sound.

Re: Matsuoka classical

Everybody is right, Matsuokas handmade are very good. The cream of the crop is serial #'s 20 thru 227. These were hand built by the master himself. he is no longer making them. One of these guitars should be worth around $2000 in mint condition. This serial numbers were made of solid top spruce very straight lines and rosewood sides and back.. very good sounding instruments (The hand made by Ryoji) Hang on to them. Regards

Matsuoka Guitar

I went into my local guitar store in search of a new classical guitar yesterday, and came across a used Matsuoka. I'm not sure of the model no. or anything at all because I didn't think of looking at the label inside the guitar then, but it was $1645.(The guy in the store told me it's been used for one year) It has amazing clarity and great projection. However, after I came home I looked around the Internet and found that most Matsuoka guitars don't even go over $300. Is it possible that the one I've found is a handmade?

Re: Matsuoka classical

: I have owned a Matsuoka classical guitar since about 1980. Like yours there is very little information on the label.
: It says " RYOJO MATUSOKA - Luthier.
: There is nothing where it says Model No. but for the serial number mine says 50... nothing else.
: My pals at Coyles Music in Richboro told me that the sides and back are laminated rosewood. The top is obviously solid spruce.
: I paid about $110.00 dollars for it in 1980 from a pawn shop in West Philly including the hardshell case. I can't complain. It sounds great.
: It has a huge amount of projection.
: Does anyone have any idea how much it could be worth.
: Ron

Re: Matsuoka classical

Previously owned a 1970's Matusoka #40 and kept it for thirty years. Learned a lot of classical repetoire with it. Was a good instrument and I played the hell out of it. The cedar top peaked at about 12 years, and the frets in the first to fifth position became quite worn. The sound got softer, mellower thereafter. If I had kept it, a re-fret and neck job would have been in order. Recently saw an old Matsuoka #60 in Japan. Beautiful back/sides and cedar top. The guitar looked like it had been stored in its case. However, the sound was lousy, and the guitar way overpriced. I think old Matsuoka guitars were definitely well-made. But I think it's a valid arguement that some of the best Japanese classicals were made by Masaru Kohno. I have played a 1969 Kohno and some of Masaki Sakurai's intruments which are superb. It's interesting how we value certain instruments huh?

Re: Matsuoka classical

I have a Matsuoka, in really good condition with lovely tone, its M40 model and i can see a D stamped into it underneath the certificate... it has been kept in a case, hardly played so i think its time I passed it on, any idea of value? or what the M stands for?? any info appreciated.

Re: Matsuoka classical posted by meg

Have not seen not seen any Matsuoka guitars with single letters stamped under the label. In some Spanish concert classical guitars, builders have carved their initials such as "AM" next to the label. I have seen one Matsuoka where the label was missing; there was a sticker with M30 typed on it. As far as I know, "M" stands for the word "model". The "value" of your Matsuoka is subjective. I've seen a 1970's Matsuoka #40 in good condition priced for under $350 in Kyoto, Japan. It had a Ramirez-style headstock, spruce top, veneer rosewood back/sides, and two rienforcing strips of stained rosewood inlaid in the back of the neck. The bridge saddle had inlay, the fret board was stained rosewood, and there was thin purfling inlaid in the top/bottom bouts. Sound favored the bass strings, and trebles were somewhat tinny. I would have offered $250 max.

Re: Matsuoka classical

In Japan you can still find a used, decent Matsuoka #40 for under $300, because they don't value "something owned and touched by someone else". Some of the recent Yamaha CG series classical guitars are very nice, and sound superior to the Matsuoka's of the 1970's and 80's. You can get these Yamaha's new for under $450. I own both brands of guitars and have compared their sounds.

Re: Matsuoka classical

: Previously owned a 1970's Matusoka #40 and kept it for thirty years. Learned a lot of classical repetoire with it. Was a good instrument and I played the hell out of it. The cedar top peaked at about 12 years, and the frets in the first to fifth position became quite worn. The sound got softer, mellower thereafter. If I had kept it, a re-fret and neck job would have been in order. Recently saw an old Matsuoka #60 in Japan. Beautiful back/sides and cedar top. The guitar looked like it had been stored in its case. However, the sound was lousy, and the guitar way overpriced. I think old Matsuoka guitars were definitely well-made. But I think it's a valid arguement that some of the best Japanese classicals were made by Masaru Kohno. I have played a 1969 Kohno and some of Masaki Sakurai's intruments which are superb. It's interesting how we value certain instruments huh?

Follow up: the old Matsuoka #60 I mentioned was from 1970. My #40 as mentioned had bigger bass tones and brighter treble tones before it peaked. Interestingly, the #60 was supposed to be a better, more expensive model, but the one I played was not exceptional. While in Japan, I bought a new Matsuoka Aranuez 710 "Damman" copy. I also tried a new Matsuoka #100 but it was no match for the 710. Overall, the 710 has much more overtones and complexity compared to the old Matsuoka sound. I think luthier Robert Brune's comments that old Matsuoka's have no collector's value is plausible. Enough for the soapbox today.

Re: Matsuoka classical

More soapbox:
What's the big fuss over old Matsuoka guitars? Have been looking at prices on the web, as well as my latest trip to Japan.
Used Matsuoka guitar prices in Japan ranged between $200- $400. Even an old #50 went for under $400. C'mon guys, this is a decent guitar, but a Bouchet or Fleta it's not. Looks like people trying to make something out of nothing.

Re: Matsuoka classical

: Previously owned a 1970's Matusoka #40 and kept it for thirty years. Learned a lot of classical repetoire with it. Was a good instrument and I played the hell out of it. The cedar top peaked at about 12 years, and the frets in the first to fifth position became quite worn. The sound got softer, mellower thereafter. If I had kept it, a re-fret and neck job would have been in order. Recently saw an old Matsuoka #60 in Japan. Beautiful back/sides and cedar top. The guitar looked like it had been stored in its case. However, the sound was lousy, and the guitar way overpriced. I think old Matsuoka guitars were definitely well-made. But I think it's a valid arguement that some of the best Japanese classicals were made by Masaru Kohno. I have played a 1969 Kohno and some of Masaki Sakurai's intruments which are superb. It's interesting how we value certain instruments huh?

Follow up: the old Matsuoka #60 I mentioned was from 1970. My #40 as mentioned had bigger bass tones and brighter treble tones. Interestingly, the #60 was supposed to be a better, more expensive model, but the one I played was not exceptional. While in I Japan, I bought a new Matsuoka Aranuez 710 "Damman" copy. I also tried a new Matsuoka #100 but it was no match for the 710. Overall, the 710 has much more overtones and complexity compared to the old Matsuoka sound. I think luthier Robert Brune's comments that old Matsuoka's have no collector's value is plausible. Enough for the soapbox today.

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Check this out if you are thinking about buying a Classical Guitar

Re: Matsuoka classical

: I have had my M40 since 1979 and i paid NZD310 for it.

I have no intetion of repalcing it - it is still in mint condition and had needed no re-fretting so far. Classical players that have tried have commented on it's mellow tone.

Re: Matsuoka classical

i am after a matsuoka would you like to sell. my teacher has one sounds good

Re: Matsuoka classical

: I have one I am looking to sell. Anyone interested?

: i am after a matsuoka would you like to sell. my teacher has one sounds good

Re: Matsuoka classical

:
I have one for sale. Get in touch if you are interested

: i am after a matsuoka would you like to sell. my teacher has one sounds good

Re: Matsuoka classical

Hi, I was searching for information on Matsuoka classical guitars and I found your guyz information. It really helped out my decision because I really wasn't sure if I should purchase one or not. I think I'm going to go for it, thanks a bunch!!

Arnold

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