sound quality versus aging of acoustic guitars

Posted by RLFOLEY on Tue, 05/23/00 - 14:12:09.

I KEEP READING IN FORUMS THAT ACOUSTIC GUITARS
START SOUNDING BETTER AS THEY GET OLDER. IS THIS
A RESULT OF THE WOOD AGING OR A SIDE EFFECT OF
BEING PLAYED MORE OFTEN ? IS THE CHANGE GOING TO
BE SO DRAMATIC THAT IT WONT SOUND ANYWHERES CLOSE
TO WHAT IT DID WHEN I INITIALLY BOUGHT IT ? HOW
LONG DOES THIS PROCESS TAKE BEFORE YOU "NOTICE"
A CHANGE IN ITS CHARACTER ? OR IS IT ALL BUNK ?!

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Re: sound quality versus aging of acoustic guitars

The sound change is due to both the wood aging and playing. The more you play the more the wood "moves" (solid top guitars only !) laminated guitar woods don't change hardly at all. The change is gradual and you may not even notice it. As far as how long it takes, that depends on how much you play and the spruce top. (or cedar or mahogony) the guitar will usually take on a more richer sound, and get louder. I have a 1950's Martin and a 60's Gibson, and that has been my experience with both.

Re: sound quality versus aging of acoustic guitars

: I KEEP READING IN FORUMS THAT ACOUSTIC GUITARS
: START SOUNDING BETTER AS THEY GET OLDER. IS THIS
: A RESULT OF THE WOOD AGING OR A SIDE EFFECT OF
: BEING PLAYED MORE OFTEN ? IS THE CHANGE GOING TO
: BE SO DRAMATIC THAT IT WONT SOUND ANYWHERES CLOSE
: TO WHAT IT DID WHEN I INITIALLY BOUGHT IT ? HOW
: LONG DOES THIS PROCESS TAKE BEFORE YOU "NOTICE"
: A CHANGE IN ITS CHARACTER ? OR IS IT ALL BUNK ?!

The playing and the aging both does affect the sound. I think the playing affect the Guitar more than the Aging, but aging does affect it.

I had a Gibson Super 300, it's an archtop Acoustic, and after owning it quite a few years it sounded incredible good. I sold the guitar to someone who was not very good at playing, and within 6 months the guitar sounded awful, you could not tell by listening that it was the same guitar.

I think it is like one guitar teacher I had told me. It's the quality of the playing that makes it sound better. He thought the molecules of the wood re-aligned themselves in tune with the music that was played on the guitar. I think he was right for the quality of the playing sure makes a big difference in how they sound.

I hang a guitar on the wall in a room where my music speakers were, from the stereo, some powerful speakers. After about a month the guitar started sounding much better. After a year the sound of the guitar was incredibly good. You could feel the guitar vibrating when the music from the speakers was coming out.

So I tried conscoiusly to change the sound of a new guitar. I put it in the room with the spearkers, played some great sounding guitar music near night and day for a month. The new guitar sounded so much more mellow and the tones so much more pure than when I brought the guitar home. So I thought that proved that the sound vibrations on the guitar make a difference in how it sounds.

Robert Lee Johnson

The Guitar Man

www.mp3.com/theguitarman

Re: sound quality versus aging of acoustic guitars

: : I KEEP READING IN FORUMS THAT ACOUSTIC GUITARS
: : START SOUNDING BETTER AS THEY GET OLDER. IS THIS
: : A RESULT OF THE WOOD AGING OR A SIDE EFFECT OF
: : BEING PLAYED MORE OFTEN ? IS THE CHANGE GOING TO
: : BE SO DRAMATIC THAT IT WONT SOUND ANYWHERES CLOSE
: : TO WHAT IT DID WHEN I INITIALLY BOUGHT IT ? HOW
: : LONG DOES THIS PROCESS TAKE BEFORE YOU "NOTICE"
: : A CHANGE IN ITS CHARACTER ? OR IS IT ALL BUNK ?!

: The playing and the aging both does affect the sound. I think the playing affect the Guitar more than the Aging, but aging does affect it.

: I had a Gibson Super 300, it's an archtop Acoustic, and after owning it quite a few years it sounded incredible good. I sold the guitar to someone who was not very good at playing, and within 6 months the guitar sounded awful, you could not tell by listening that it was the same guitar.

: I think it is like one guitar teacher I had told me. It's the quality of the playing that makes it sound better. He thought the molecules of the wood re-aligned themselves in tune with the music that was played on the guitar. I think he was right for the quality of the playing sure makes a big difference in how they sound.

: I hang a guitar on the wall in a room where my music speakers were, from the stereo, some powerful speakers. After about a month the guitar started sounding much better. After a year the sound of the guitar was incredibly good. You could feel the guitar vibrating when the music from the speakers was coming out.

: So I tried conscoiusly to change the sound of a new guitar. I put it in the room with the spearkers, played some great sounding guitar music near night and day for a month. The new guitar sounded so much more mellow and the tones so much more pure than when I brought the guitar home. So I thought that proved that the sound vibrations on the guitar make a difference in how it sounds.

: Robert Lee Johnson

: The Guitar Man

: www.mp3.com/theguitarman

That kicks a$$ man.. i will keep that in mind as i learn to play :)

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