Marcelo Barbero 1970 Classical Guitar

Posted by Sean Terriah on Fri, 09/05/03 - 10:26:47.

I have a Marcelo Barbero 1970 Classical Guitar distributed by Sherry Brener Ltd. It's in mint condition, with cedar top and indian rosewood sides and back.

Does anyone know the origin of this instrument and potential value.

Any information would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks
Sean



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Re: Marcelo Barbero 1970 Classical Guitar

Hi Sean,

Have you got any pics of your guitar? How does it sound and play?
Do you play it regularly?
Drop me a line for a chat about it.

Thanks,

Pat

Re: Marcelo Barbero 1970 Classical Guitar

I have one of these guitars. I bought it from my guitar teacher in Charlotte, NC. He used to travel to Spain frequently, was a student of Montoya and a real pro. He highly recommended this guitar and I bought in 1972 for $350. I am trying to research the current value. Have you gotten a value on yours yet?

: Hi Sean,

: Have you got any pics of your guitar? How does it sound and play?
: Do you play it regularly?
: Drop me a line for a chat about it.

: Thanks,

: Pat

Re: Marcelo Barbero 1970 Classical Guitar

: I have one of these guitars. I bought it from my guitar teacher in Charlotte, NC. He used to travel to Spain frequently, was a student of Montoya and a real pro. He highly recommended this guitar and I bought in 1972 for $350. I am trying to research the current value. Have you gotten a value on yours yet?

:
: : Hi Sean,

: : Have you got any pics of your guitar? How does it sound and play?
: : Do you play it regularly?
: : Drop me a line for a chat about it.

: : Thanks,

: : Pat

Re: Marcelo Barbero 1970 Classical Guitar

Do you still have this marcelino barbero guitar? I Have a Marcelo Barbero flamenco from 1950 and would very much like to buy a guitar made by his son. Thanks,
Andy
: : I have one of these guitars. I bought it from my guitar teacher in Charlotte, NC. He used to travel to Spain frequently, was a student of Montoya and a real pro. He highly recommended this guitar and I bought in 1972 for $350. I am trying to research the current value. Have you gotten a value on yours yet?

: :
: : : Hi Sean,

: : : Have you got any pics of your guitar? How does it sound and play?
: : : Do you play it regularly?
: : : Drop me a line for a chat about it.

: : : Thanks,

: : : Pat

Re: Marcelo Barbero 1970 Classical Guitar

: I have a Marcelo Barbero 1970 Classical Guitar distributed by Sherry Brener Ltd. It's in mint condition, with cedar top and indian rosewood sides and back.

:
: Does anyone know the origin of this instrument and potential value.

: Any information would be greatly appreciated.

: Thanks
: Sean
: From Ginger.
I don't have a Marcelo Barbero, But, I have a
Marcelino from his son, who was the last of an
almost 400 year dynasty of guitar, builders. I
have never seen a Marcello sell for less than
55hundred. There is a great history behind these
guitars. The original first guitar is I believe
owned by the luthier school in Phonix, AZ. It was
converted by a Barbero, from a lute with more strings.
Sherry Brenner who was the importer for these guitars,
is now long dead. Back in 1983, I took my 1967
Marcelino, originally bought from him, back just to
see what he would say it was now worth. Of the
Marcelino's, mine is probably the best. It was the
prototype of Marcelino's Classical guitars. Mine
was made of the best wood I have ever seen, the growth
rings are so small it's almost unreal. As the first
one into the country,along with it's flamenco counter-
part, it was according to Sherry the best one Marcelino
had ever made. In 1983, Sherry told me that he could
have it sold in four days minimum for 10,000 yes, ten
thousand dollars. I would rather lose my house than
my guitar. It will always be in my family, as we are
all players. My father was buying his first flamenco
Ramirez the day I bought mine. Chet Atkins had been
to Sherry's the day before and creamed off the best
six Ramirez guitars Sherry Had, at the time. Dad was
in the shop all day until he found A Flamenco Ramirez
that pleased him. Mom and I literraly talked to Sherry
all day and got to be friends. I bought mine for a
Guild six-string, and three hundred and sixty five
dollars, paid in thirty dollar payments, each month.
I walked out of his upstairs shop on 63rd street in
Chicago with that guitar, and my promise to pay. I
still have my original sales contract. I am guessing
that that was the most amazing deal ever done at his
shop as I was only 16 at the time. My Dad is Mel Agen.
so you might recognize his name. He Has Flamenco
books published by Mel Bay Co. since about 1970.
Your guitar can only increase in value, until it
disintigrates, which hopefully will be never.
Sincerely, Ginger.

Re: Marcelo Barbero 1970 Classical Guitar

Sean,

I have a Sherry-Brenner Barbero from the same era. Some years back I did some research on its origins. Here's what I learned: Sherry-Brenner had these guitars built in a shop in Japan, and then stuck in the "Marcelino Barbero - Antigua Casa Madrid" labels, thereby representing them as being made by the son of Marcelo Barbero. (Marcelo Barbero could not have made a guitar in 1970 since he died in 1955 or 1956, I forget which. There is a Marcelino Barbero who I believe made a few flamenco instruments while working in the shop of Fernandez, but that may be incorrect.) Around 1972, this misrepresentation was discovered by a customer. There may have been a lawsuit. In any case, the labels were removed from the remaining instruments in stock and they were sold at sharply reduced prices. (I own one of the "label-less" Barberos from 1970.)

This all was a bit of a scandal. Sherry-Brenner often sold these instruments through guitar teachers. Somewhere in Ohio -- perhaps U. of Akron -- a guitar faculty member lost his job for selling a student a guitar represented as being made by the Barbero family.

How do I know all this is so? Well, some is information I gleaned from Nelson Winter, a guitar teacher at U. of Michigan who used to work for Sherry-Brenner. But I also have some independent confirmation that Barberos are not Spanish instruments. Richard Brune -- perhaps the most knowledgable person in the classical guitar field -- did some work on my "Barbero". He knew the scoop about these instruments, and pointed out several construction features (such as how the nut sits against the fingerboard) that are distinctively Japanese. Further, the internal bracing of these instruments is a dead on copy not of Barbero's style, but of the Ramirez 1A.

Incidentally, Jim Sherry (of Sherry Brenner) is not the best person to ask about the provenance or value of these instruments for obvious reasons of self-interest. I took my Barbero by his shop on Michigan Avenue in Chicago in 1990, and he dissembled (lied outright, in fact) about it being made by a Spanish builder who worked in the Ramirez shop. He also claimed it was worth $3900 back then. (By the way, I think Jim Sherry is still alive, contrary to another post.)

The Sherry Brenner Barberos are of the same general family as the Hernandis (as well as several other fictional builders like Federico Garcia). Note that the labels in these later instruments state "Final Assembly - Japan".

What is your Barbero worth? A lot depends on the condition and construction. Some of the Barberos are all solid wood guitars, and with some work on the fingerboard and a new set of tuners are hard to distinguish from a Ramirez 1A of the same era. I have one of those, and Brune appraised it at $2500. He has a similar instrument for sale in his shop (a "Lorca"), and is asking in the mid-2K range. There were, however, Barberos made without solid woods on the sides and backs, and those are less desirable and less valuable.

On the positive side, if you have a solid-wood Barbero what you really have is a guitar almost as good as a Ramirez 1A at a fraction of the cost. My is a splendid instrument with a big sound.

If you intend to play it regularly, I'd suggest having a good classical luthier look it over. The top bracing was a relatively soft wood, and the top can "dish" between the soundhole and the bridge. This can affect the alignment of the fingerboard, and make the action really high. Further, the original fingerboards were virtually flat. They are much nicer when given a gentle radius. A good luthier can do both for you.

Good luck!

Ray

Marcelino Barbero 1967

I also have a Classical Guitar Marcelino Barbero that I bought in 1984 from Rosewood Guitar, Seattle WA. The tag inside the guitar indicates that it was built in 1967 and another number to the left shows 1882. In between and above the numbers is the word MADRID (I don't know what MADRID is) Back then, I paid more than $600 dollars. It took me almost two years to pay off the guitar. I have never tried to find out the value of it, but in the year 2000 I joined the Seattle Guitar Orchestra and tried to compare the sound quality with the $9000 thousand guitar from one of the players in my group. I noticed that the sound quality of mine was better (louder with high notes and warmer with low notes) than the $9000 dollar guitar. To replace the sound quality like the one I am having now, I expect that it would cost between 10K to 15K to replace it.

Marcelino Barbaro

I believe I have a guitar as you describe. I purchased it in Denver in 1968 for $ 650. Same label as yours . Would be interested in hearing from you and comparing our guitars.
Thankss.

Bob W.

Sherry-Brenner brands

I have acquired 4 Garcia "projects" over the past couple of years (two grade 2 and two grade 3s). The earlier grade 2 (1969 - listed as Federico Garcia) has slightly better tonal qualities than the 1970 grade 2 (listed as Garcia), and both out perform my Goya G-20. The earlier grade 3, sporting only the Garcia label, sounds better that the other grade 3 which has the typical double, non-connected labels. I have seen a grade 3 that is newer yet and has one label with the same information as found on the two label versions. What this indicates to me is that Sherry-Brenner was in a manufacturing transition period from late 1969/early 1970 until 1971, shifting manufacturing from Spain to Japan, and I see a definite difference in the quality of the later guitars compared to the earlier models of the same grade. Unfortunately, Jim Sherry has been vilified by certain individuals because of the way the transition was handled and viewed by those individuals. However, based on my own experience with the aforementioned models, the opinions of the majority of other posters, and the information on the Sherry-Brenner website, I am convinced that the earlier Garcia guitars are generally under-valued and are of much higher quality than some would lead us to believe. As for me, I will not be selling either of the grade 2 models any time soon, as I cannot currently afford replacements of equal sound or quality.

Sherry-Brenner Brands

I finally started school at the Art Institute of Atlanta for Audio Production in 2011, and decided to take up guitar so that I would be of more use with musical compositions. I talked to my dad, and he gave me his 1972 Antonio Hernandis Grade 1, that he bought new back in 1972. I was looking at the stat sheet for how Grade 1s were built - straight from their www.guitarsofspain.com website's guide sheet - and all of the wood types are different. Would this guitar also be one of the "knock-offs" built between '69 and '71? I have been skeptical of its value since I first looked at their website (especially since the materials listed did not match), but I am still trying to get more information about the guitar. Any help that can be provided would be greatly appreciated.

Sherry-Brenner Brands

Sorry, here's more info I have about the guitar and its purchase:

My dad lived in Charlotte, NC at the time, and though he started at UNCC that year, and he claims to have purchased it from a store in town at a huge discount. He said he bought it for $250 instead of the $1000 it was listed for because the store he bought it at had caught fire, and the guitar had a crack below the bridge in the shell from the heat.

I eventually will get the guitar repaired and give it back to him, but being in school generates some issues with getting that done anytime soon. Thanks for any information.

1969 Antinio Hernandis 12 string, grade 2

I recently purchased a 1969 hernandis 12 string, the label has no wood types but does say No. 2 1969. it also says casa sherry-brennerm madrid.

several questions i had new tuners , strings and pegs put on the guitar, it came with none. the finish is excellent, and the tone is starting to get real good as the strings stretch out. I have been told by jim sherry that there were never many of htese made.
Is it rare or collectable? I got it from the original owner, it has always been in a hard case the neck is very straight. the luther who put it back together for me said it was made in spain. any way to tell? is it valuable/ it seems to sound better every day.
any ideas????

Marcelino Barbero by Sherry Brenner

I would be interested in buying a grade 1a Marcelino Barbero by Sherry Brenner. The most recent Marcelino Barbero by Sherry Brenner sold on Ebay for $319.36 plus shipping. I would be interested in buying a grade 1a or the earlier model that was all solid woods but not marked with a grade number. carterboucher@gmail.com

1969 Marcelino Barbero Classical Guitar

Hey There,
Did you ever find a Marcelino Barbero? I've got one for sale. It's a 1969. It's been repaired for cracks on the soundboard along the neck on the treble side and center seam. It's hard to find one that doesn't have cracks these days. It plays well. Nice action. I'm in Hollywood, CA, but I'm happy to ship. Let me know if you're interested
Thanks,
Billy
billy.savage at iCloud dot com
bill at klunkerz dot com
323 393-5710

1969 Marcelino Barbero by Sherry Brenner

I have a 1969 Marcelino Barbero in excellent condition it will be going in an estate sale and I am looking for an estimate price?

Sherry Brener guitars

Let me make it clear. If you own a Sherry Brener guitar you should not even call it a Barbero because it has about as much in common with a Barbero like a Shark with a Lepard. A real Barbero would cost you as much or even more than a Ramirez 1A and it would sound at least as good if not better. I have never played a Sherry Brener guitar to be honest. They might be good copies but they are a copy produced somewhere in Sushi land. Sherry Brener made quite some bucks with those copies just because everybody wanted a Barbero. This business plan obviously worked fine for him but it is actually a deception.

1969 Marcelino Barbero

Hi I also Have a 1969 Marcelino Barbero Acoustic Gutair I have had since 1969 My mother bought it new for me from Sherman and Clay in Oakland. It also says 1882 -1969. It is in great shape. Don't kow what it is worth but would like to find out.. Thanks Duncan

Sherry Brenner 1969 Marcelino Barbero

I also have the 1969 Marcelino Barbero solid wood,
cedar top, rosewood sides and back. I’ve recorded a number of
Albums with it over the last 30 years and it is a
wonderful sounding instrument. The instrument would probably be worth
$1700 - $3200 to a player not a collector depending on its condition, playability and sound quality.
I used to have a Contreras that I sold, lots of intonation issues and was very difficult and stiff to play. this guitar ran circles around it on how it played and how musical responsive and dynamic it is.

I was recently visited a boutique guitar shop and played
countless Spanish guitars by famous Spanish builders in the 5K to 20K range.
I can honestly say that my little Japan made Marcelino Barbero in a blindfold test would’ve been in the top five.
I love mine and will probably never part with it.

From what I have learned about the instruments over the years, supposedly Sherry Brenner used all Spanish woods, bought and milled in Spain. Then had them assembled in Japan, maybe it was cheaper labor that way, but his intent was always to build a low cost high quality Spanish style guitar. I think he definitely accomplished that, it’s how he went about marketing them where he made a bad decision. I understand that there’s a number of jazz finger style players that own this guitar, Lenny Breau used to play one as does Phil Sheeran.

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