Old Framus?

I would really appreciate any advice...

I was given an old arch top f-holed acoustic, the stradle and machine heads were missing and the nut is split.

The guitar has a 'Framus' transfer under the lower f-hole and the headstock seems to be the right shape for Framus.

My problem is I've been chopping and changing the guitar to suit my style (4-string), so far I've only altered the missing bits but the nut is next and I just want to know I'm not messing up something rare/old/etc.

This is the guitar in its current state:

On the back of the headstock appears to be stamped: 14027. I've been to the Framus site but it all seems to concern the new electric (Washburn) guitars and amps, VintAxe doesn't seem to cover them...any suggestions?

Thanks,
Tim.

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4-string? Out of interest, how are you tuning that? Is it like a tenor guitar tuning?

E-A-D-G

I'm a bassist, I basically carry this guitar around the house and play blues on it, I only need those four for blues runs and it means I can have them 16mm apart at the bridge (same as my Aria) but the taper is crazy as the nut is still original.

Hopefully (odd as it sounds) the guitar won't be worth much and I can make a new nut giving the strings the same taper as my bass, don't think I'll ever put it down then!

Tim.

Hi Tim,

The guitar looks to me like a mid 50's model. I have a picture of a mid 50's Sorella (5/59 model) that looks very similar except the Sorella has a cut-away. So, my guess is that it is either a Rosita model 5/58 or a Tango (5/57) but I can't know for sure since I don't have a picture of either of these 2 guitars.

Anyway, I say don't hurt it. Value at best is probably $400-$500 USD since it will have nonoriginal parts, but it definately looks worth restoring. If you want something acoustic to carry around the house and bonk on get a 60's Kay or Truetone archtop for $70 and make whatever mods you want. BTW, thanks for visiting VintAxe. SB

Tim, there are Frami semi basses with the "Bill Wyman" connection that people ask money for. Whether they get it is a moot point. Anyhoo, can I ask a few Qs?

Are they the original tuners, and you just removed a couple? I really, really would be surprised if they're the original tuners. If they're not, who cares about changing the nut? You're right, it needs to be done toot dasweet to play as a bass. The current spacing is awful. If youi want to re-sell as an acoustic 6er in the future, I doubt if a replaced nut would be the biggest issue.

Thanks SB, I'll look up some of those models, great site by the way just didn't happen to have what I needed this time, thanks for the advice though. Didn't realise it might be that old, lovely tone for blues though.

Hey 1bassleft, No they're not, they're more like Strat style things, the originals were 'misplaced' by the original owner along with the straddle. Like I said the only original bit I'd want to change is the nut which is split above the low E anyway, as shown:

I don't really play it as a bass so much as a bit of both, sort of, I just love the sound basically and find it easy to write on when just sat chilling or waiting for downloads or whatever...

Thanks for all your advice,

Tim.

If you do lift out the old nut, I found graphite to be the easiest to work with when making a new one. A very handy tech and all-round pleasant guy I've dealt with has produced a handy calculator for string-spacing on a new nut. His name's Steve, in the 'burbs of Manchester, and here's the link to his nuts :shock:

http://www.manchesterguitartech.co.uk/onlinetools.html

Looks like an excellent site, thanks for the link. I'll go and Explore...

Tim.

If you do take out the old nut a good tip is to cut around the nut with a craft knife, this will stop the laquer splitting out when you remove it, you should get a block of wood and push it up against the nut (fretboard side) and give it a sharp tap with a hammer knocking the nut backwards towards the head, the new one can then be replaced using instant glue.

Thanks Lee, that makes sense, I'll think I'll take the plunge...any restoration would need to replace the nut anyway I assume? so it may as well replace the new one cut for 4 strings and in the meantime I get the guitar I want.

Thanks again, Tim.

good luck tim.

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