S Yairi Guitars. Info wanted.

I own two S Yairi guitars. Can anyone give me more info on them?

Guitar 1 is an S Yairi acoustic hand made instrument. It looks like a Martin D18 only it has a truss rod cover on the headstock which a D18 doesn't have. Model number reads 710 and serial number is 594. It was made in March 1975. I bought it off Ebay and it was in a state. The table was "bellying" at the bridge, it needed new machineheads, a nut, new bridge and saddle and fret dressing. It has been fully restored by a luthier and plays beautifully.

Guitar 2 is an S Yairi B & M Virtuoso classical guitar. Model no 396 made in 1968. I bought this off ebay as well. It had been on display in a Carribean Club in Liverpool and had been maltreated as someone had glued foam rubber to its back which ruined the finish. The heel has also had a repair. I have refinished the back of the guitar and replaced the machineheads. It now looks pretty good and plays beautifully with an amazing tone.
This came with a taay but solid guitar case.

I own several guitars including a Martin D18. I had never heard of S Yairi until a few weeks ago when I bought the classical guitar. I am very impressed with both of them and would appreciate any info you can share re history and value and rating. :)

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Hi Matt,
Yairi acoustics have come up here on Guitarsite before and, just from memory, I know them to be hand-made in Japan and highly prized by those who appreciate acoustics. They can also turn up cheaply and perhaps abused by people who've never heard of them. Well done for spotting those two. Rather than type a huge wodge, this discussion on another site will interest you:
http://www.guitarseminars.com/ubb/Forum1/HTML/000157.html

Hope that helps.

Hey Matt,

While off looking for information on the Shinko Guitar Company I ran across this blurb on S. Yari. Looks to be quality information.

Sadao or Sada Yairi was a guitar maker and guitar manufacturer from Nagoya, Japan who was active from the 1960s to the 1990s. He sold guitars under a number of labels including Sadao Yairi, Yairi Gakki, S. Yairi, and Sada Guitar. He also manufactured guitars for B&M (distributed in the UK) Lowden, Sherry-Brener and a few guitars for Alvarez of St. Louis Music during the early 1970s. During the early 1990s, he had a line of handmade guitars sold by Samick in S. Korea.

Information on Sadao Yairi is scant and a number of Japanese Sadao Yairi collectors confirm that Sadao Yairi’s guitar making history is shrouded in mystery especially after a 1990s statement by Kazuo Yairi, of Alvarez Yairi fame, that Kazuo and Sadao have no working relationship.

The consensus is that Sadao and Kazuo Yairi are cousins who learned guitar making from Kazuo Yairi‘s dad, also named Sadao Yairi. The older Sadao, had worked as a guitar and violin maker at the Suzuki, Takehuru factory in Nagoya and then later opened his own business, Yairi & Son, which operated until about 1970-71. Nagoya is the major industrial port city in Aichee prefecture and one of Japan's long established guitar making centers.

In the late 1960s Sada and Kazuo went their own way and began making guitars under their own label, with Sada establishing S. Yairi guitars in Nagoya and Kazuo Yairi starting up K. Yairi Guitars in Kani, which is about 30 minutes from Nagoya. Both Sadao and Kazuo made guitars for Alvarez/St. Louis Music Company in the early 1970s, but Kazuo ended up getting an exclusive contract with St. Louis Music. Kazuo's guitars sold by SLM were first known as Alvarez by Kazuo Yairi and then Alvarez Yairi guitars.

In the early 1970s, Sadao had a number of guitar ventures including Yairi Gakki and S Yairi Guitars (gakki is the Japanese word for guitar). S. Yairi made guitars for B&M in the UK and for Lowden in the USA. Sadao also made some Alvarez guitars for SLM in the early 1970s. He went bankrupt in the late 1980s. As a result of the bankruptcy, he went to South Korea in the early 1990s and worked for Samick guitars, developing a short-lived line of handmade guitars labeled "Samick by S. Yairi".

In the 1990s Kazuo Yairi published a statement that there was no working relationship between him and his cousin Sadao (probably because of the bankruptcy). I believe that Sadao Yairi passed away during the 1990s.

Sometime during the late 1990s/early 2000s, a Japanese venture started to manufacture low quality guitars using the S. Yairi name. These guitars are made in China and are not the same quality as S. Yairi guitars made during the 1960s to 1980s.

Some more S Yari info at Mark Myers Blog:

http://markmyers1.blogspot.com/2008/02/mark-myers.html

SB wrote:
While off looking for information on the Shinko Guitar Company I ran across this blurb on S. Yari. Looks to be quality information.

Some of this info is correct, but not everything noted is accurate. I will try to "edit" and add corrections to the post.

Sadao or Sada Yairi was a guitar maker and guitar manufacturer from Nagoya, Japan who was active from the 1960s to the 1990s. He sold guitars under a number of labels including Sadao Yairi, Yairi Gakki, S. Yairi, and Sada Guitar. He also manufactured guitars for B&M (distributed in the UK) Lowden, Sherry-Brener and a few guitars for Alvarez of St. Louis Music during the early 1970s. During the early 1990s, he had a line of handmade guitars sold by Samick in S. Korea.

Sadao Yairi actually began much earlier than the 1960's, starting his first "Factory" in 1935 at the age of 29. He also used the Yairi and son label, among Aria and others, besides the ones listed.

Information on Sadao Yairi is scant and a number of Japanese Sadao Yairi collectors confirm that Sadao Yairi’s guitar making history is shrouded in mystery especially after a 1990s statement by Kazuo Yairi, of Alvarez Yairi fame, that Kazuo and Sadao have no working relationship.

I don't find the statement by Kazuo to be unusual, he was just clarifying the fact that they did not work together, and his instruments had no connection to the ones of Sadao.

The consensus is that Sadao and Kazuo Yairi are cousins who learned guitar making from Kazuo Yairi‘s dad, also named Sadao Yairi. The older Sadao, had worked as a guitar and violin maker at the Suzuki, Takehuru factory in Nagoya and then later opened his own business, Yairi & Son, which operated until about 1970-71. Nagoya is the major industrial port city in Aichee prefecture and one of Japan's long established guitar making centers.

Sadao Yairi was related to Kazuo, not his cousin but, his Uncle. Both Kazuo Yairi's father and Sadao worked at Suzuki Violin Co. prior to leaving and starting their own businesses. As stated prior, Sadao was the one that also made Yairi and Son (there weren't TWO Sadao's in the picture), he began the Yairi and Son models with his son Hiroshi, who actually made most of those models under his father's supervision as is noted by the stamps on the label/backs of the guitars.

In the late 1960s Sada and Kazuo went their own way and began making guitars under their own label, with Sada establishing S. Yairi guitars in Nagoya and Kazuo Yairi starting up K. Yairi Guitars in Kani, which is about 30 minutes from Nagoya. Both Sadao and Kazuo made guitars for Alvarez/St. Louis Music Company in the early 1970s, but Kazuo ended up getting an exclusive contract with St. Louis Music. Kazuo's guitars sold by SLM were first known as Alvarez by Kazuo Yairi and then Alvarez Yairi guitars.

In the early 1970s, Sadao had a number of guitar ventures including Yairi Gakki and S Yairi Guitars (gakki is the Japanese word for guitar). S. Yairi made guitars for B&M in the UK and for Lowden in the USA. Sadao also made some Alvarez guitars for SLM in the early 1970s. He went bankrupt in the late 1980s. As a result of the bankruptcy, he went to South Korea in the early 1990s and worked for Samick guitars, developing a short-lived line of handmade guitars labeled "Samick by S. Yairi".

In the 1990s Kazuo Yairi published a statement that there was no working relationship between him and his cousin Sadao (probably because of the bankruptcy). I believe that Sadao Yairi passed away during the 1990s.

Sometime during the late 1990s/early 2000s, a Japanese venture started to manufacture low quality guitars using the S. Yairi name. These guitars are made in China and are not the same quality as S. Yairi guitars made during the 1960s to 1980s.

These "reissue" models of S. Yairi early guitars are under the supervision of his son, Hiroshi (74 years old). As to the quality, I can't say since I do not own one. However, I have read that there were some issues in the beginning, but that those were corrected. UPDATE: Recently found information noting that of the reissued S. Yairi brand, only the high end models are made in Japan.

[/i]

http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/Alvarez_AlvarezYairi_plus/

http://yairiguitars.spaces.live.com/

Hello

I have got a very rare guitar Sadao Yairi no 722 created in 1966.
Barnes and Mullins exporters (B&M Soloist)
I am seaking more information about Sadao and his guitars from this period.
The instrument sounds magical.

I have decided to sell it on american Ebay.
you can find it there.

Where can i find contacts to Japanese Yairi Colectors ?

Hello,

If it is a soloist, the 722 is probably not a model number. Photo's would be a big help too.

For a place to post photo's and ask info:

http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/Alvarez_AlvarezYairi_plus/

yl

http://yairiguitars.spaces.live.com/

Hello,
S. Yairi build for Samick wonderfull steelstring guitars from 1984 to 1997. Began with a S3 and goes to the top S7, S7-EC and S8.
Well manufactured handcrafted custom guitars with a excelent sound.
I'm very glad to owne a S7 and S7-EC and they are wonderfull.
Dreadnought but a little bit smaller, like my classic guitars, with wonderfull wood like all the Lowdens with cedar and rosewood and with a long soft and smoth tone.
The S7-EC (electric/cutaway) isn't so loud as the S7, it's the fist time that I notice that guitars lose some sound by a cutaway... but you have it away and with piezo.

If there is anyone who wants to buy "one" of this guitars, please make me a offer.

I can send pictures and some pages from a old catalog from Samick Yairi guitars.

I need only one.

G heinzschenk email heinzschenk42@yahoo.de

Hi, new to this forum...

I recently wrote to Barnes & Mullin seeking info about my Soloist from 1966:

Here's the reply:

Quote:
Hi Sullivan,
Barnes and Mullins imported the ‘Yairi’ Soloist from 1966 till 1979.
The guitars were supplied by a Japanese trading company so the actual source of manufacture is unclear.
In 1966 guitars from Japan represented incredible value for money and the price at the time was £27.7.6.
By 1974 the position had completely changed, Japan was on longer competitive at this end of the market and the product was discontinued.
We continued to import more expensive ‘Yairi’ models until 1982 when our supplier went out of business.
By this time ‘Spanish’ made classical guitars offered much better value for money.
Unfortunately the image of the ‘Yairi’ Soloist has been cut out of the catalogue in our library, but from memory your guitar has 3 or 4 black rings around the soundhole rather than a rosette.
The description is as follows.
‘The famous Yairi Finger Style guitars possess a volume and quality of tone which would be difficult to improve upon. Every Yairi guitar is hand built with infinite care and with the finest woods and materials.The bellies of these guitars are specially fan strutted so that the essential lightness of constructions can be obtained.’
As with so many products today, price deflation means we can much more for our money now than in 1966.
In 1966 my wage was approx £7.00 per week,today someone doing a similar job is probably earning £300.00.per week.
That would equate to a retail price today of approx £1200.00.
However you would only pay approx £250.00 today to obtain a guitar of similar build and sound quality.
I hope this info helps.
Regards

Bruce Perrin
Managing Director (Joint)

Barnes and Mullins Ltd,
Unit 14, Mile Oak Ind Estate, Oswestry, Shropshire, SY10 8GA
Direct Tel: 0044 (0)1691 668319, Office: 0044 (0)1691 652449, Fax: 0044 (0)1691 655582.
Registered in England and Wales No. 01305000

Mine was given to my mother new when she was pregnant with me 45 years ago.

It sounds fantastic.

I know it's a spruce top, but I'm not sure which woods it's side and back are. But all faces are solid.

I don't think you'd ge a guitar that matures like this nowadays for the £250 quoted ;)

It sounds fantastic and I wouldn't part with it for pretty much any money.

The only hassle is I'm trying to source some machine heads with 1 1/4" barrel spacing instead of the usual 1 3/8" (35mm) spacing.

Any pointers in this direction would be much appreciated.

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