Crestline Guitars

Posted by RANDY on Sat, 11/24/01 - 23:07:45.

Crestline was the house brand for Grossman Music Corp of Cleveland, Ohio who were musical instrument importers / distributors. They were acquired by Grover Musical Products.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grover_Musical_Products,_Inc.

The guitars were made by various Japanese manufacturers, many from the Matsumoko area which were known for making excellent copies of very high quality. Other brands made by these manufacturers are Maya, Aria, Electra, Westone, etc. so the quality of your Crestline depends on which company got the manufacturing contract and when it was made. My 80's Crestline Gibson Marauder copy is very well made except for the tuners with the sheetmetal covers, (which were the big weak point in Japanese guitars.)



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Re: crestline guitars

As far as i know its a special remake of a les paul thats all i know.

Re: crestline guitars

I own a Crestline acoustic guitar model no. CR9001 that was new sometime around the late 70's early 80's. I would love to know something about this company as well, because this is the greatest guitar I've owned.

Re: crestline guitars

crestline was a japanese manufacturer in the late 70s early 80s. They specialized in copies of famous models by a variety of companies. Most of the guitars were very low end with low quality materials and workmanship. A few were decent enough to play and would half way stay in tune.

Re: crestline guitars

: crestline was a japanese manufacturer in the late 70s early 80s. They specialized in copies of famous models by a variety of companies. Most of the guitars were very low end with low quality materials and workmanship. A few were decent enough to play and would half way stay in tune.

Re: crestline guitars

i have a crestline les paul copy, i have no idea the year on it. but it is one of the best guitars i've ever played. it is far from low end if you ask me, and i've played alot of guitars also. i have no idea what it's worth, i figure it's gotta be worth something, after gibson sued all the companies that made the copies. if anyone can tell me anything about the origin of crestline, email me, i'd like to know...

Re: crestline guitars

Ditto!

I have 30 some guitars, ranging from G and L ASATs and on and on, and picked up a near mint Crestline SG on eBay last week. It is, without a doubt, one of THE hottest guitars I own. Its a ripping hot double pup very very close copy of the SG. Nothing wrong with it for the money! (to mail me remove the @@@@)

crestline guitars

Hi just came across this old post .
I also have an old Crestline , a gibson sg copy. made in japan. I did some research and found that crestline was one of the better japanese mfgs. and probably part of a larger company due to the wide assortment they offered. I also have many guitars 10-12 including a much more expensive les paul and a less expensive strat. I thought the quality of the crestline was just awsome! I did replace the tuners and had it professioanly set up etc, neck adjusted blah blah.
I LOVE to play this guitar! I bought it from a friend who picked it up at a yard sale and I paid $25 ! I love the neck on this thing and the vintage sound. I read that crestline often imported American parts , pick ups etc and re-branded them in their guitars. I would never let this guitar go. Hope that helps you out

Crestline Les Paul copy

I have a MIJ Crestline Les Paul copy, bolt on neck, stays in tune, Great build quality and sounds awesome $100. from a Graigslist Ad. I call it the Growler! And would never sell it.

Re: crestline guitars

Found a Crestline acoustic in a home we were looking at purchasing...been "abandoned for 4 years, and came out of the case, in perfect tune! True, about the Japanese manufacturing, but heard that Les Paul and strat copies are sweet. Does anyone know what they are worth?

Crestline guitars

"crestline was a japanese manufacturer in the late 70s early 80s. They specialized in copies of famous models by a variety of companies. Most of the guitars were very low end with low quality materials and workmanship. A few were decent enough to play and would half way stay in tune." -
Hate to disagree with you but Crestline stopped producing the strat copy after being sued by Fender not because it was crap but because people were buying them in the 70's and cutting in to their (Fender) bottom line. Crestline stopped production in 1979. You don't see many anymore and true some were better then others but if you can find one it will be the best strat knockoff for the money that is out there. Most electronics were imported to Japan from the same American companies Gibson and Fender used. The hardware and wood came from the same suppliers the "big boys" used as well. I own one that I picked up at a flea market for less than 100.00 dollars. Considering what crap is out there now, The Crestline strat copy was and is a hell of a deal! Check the prices on ebay! 250 to 550 is the norm and you could buy one new back in the day for 125.00 dollars. The bottom line is if you like the way it plays and sounds, buy it. If you sign a recording contract or win the lotto , buy a real one!

Re: crestline guitars

i have a crest line telecaster and it playes beautiful. but i got it for free thanx to a friend. but it is missing 1 tuner e mail me if u can find some.

crestline guitars

after reading through these old posts, it's interesting to me some of the negative comments made about these guitars.from people who never owned one. In the late seventies when Crestline was still in business in Japan, I happen to own a Les Paul. This guitar had a set neck that was absolutely perfect, it had a nice thick heavy body with the beautiful contoured top, the bindings were perfect, the finish was beautiful,the fretboard was perfect, the action was fantastic. The tone and the electronics were indistinguishable from a Gibson. This particular guitar was a copy of a Les Paul Custom cherry burst, with gold trim. The headstock was identical to the Les Paul open book style and this guitar, had it not said Crestline on the headstock was indistinguishable from the real thing.ultimately Gibson began a campaign of suing any foreign manufacturer of copy guitars because of the quality of this very guitar. I would love to find another one today, because regrettably, I pawned this one in Florida to buy a plane ticket home...... Wish I had her back!! Moral of the story? Don't knock it till you try it.

Re: crestline guitars

: Does anyone know who manufactured crestline guitars?

hmm.. it's not nice to knock someone else guitar, especially if they like it. The crestline SG was not junk.

http://store.bluebookinc.com/downloads/BrowseCategory.asp?Product=electricguitar&Heading=212
bluebook says:
Crestline:
Instruments previously built in Japan circa mid to late 1970s. Distributed by the Grossman Music Corporation of Cleveland, Ohio.
These entry level to intermediate solid body guitars featured designs based on classic American favorites. Crestline offered a wide range of stringed instruments, including classical, folk, dreadnought, and 12-string acoustics; solid body electric guitars and basses; amplifiers; banjos, mandolins, and ukuleles. Considering the amount of instruments available, the Crestline trademark was probably used on guitars built by one of the bigger Japanese guitar producers and rebranded for the U.S. market. One model reviewed at a vintage guitar show was based on Gibson´s Les Paul design, and had Grover tuners, 2 Japanese covered humbuckers, and decent wood.

i wrote a review about my Crestline SG at Harmony Central's site.
I also own a bunch of guitars. the Crestline SG was my first solidbody electric that i bought for myself.
in the mid to late 70's, the music store i used to get lessons at carried Gibson, Fender, Baldwin, Conn, Yamaha(accosutics only), and Crestline.

A new Crestline SG with the bigsby style tremelo was a little over $300 (US dollars). about 339 or 349.
they also has les paul copies by Crestline there, they had one with one of those yellowish red sunburst finishes, about $289 if i recall... so the prices were similar.
I got mine there for $133, but that was about 10 years later. it was one of a few older guitars they had forgotten about in their warehouse.. old stock, but new, so they decided to sell them off, cheap. mine had a few scratches on the back and on the back of the neck, but was ok.
it didnt stay in tune well when it was new, but the strings that came on it were the original old strings. the bigsby spring needed to break in a bit to stabilize, and new strings helped.
it would stay in tune better with 10s than 9's, and with ernie ball, or adarios.. regular electric strings.

i used to abuse the strings terribley with major tremelo use. at the time I recall people always said you had to have a real gibson or a real strat, and that vibrato bars were for basicly, idiots. no serious guitar player.
funny how a few years later they became popular again. then they started to design better tremeloes for the folks that wanted to do major dive bombs without it going out of tune.
kah;ler had a good one then, so did some others. then later floyd roses came out. floyd rose bought out their competition, as i recall.
but nearly any guitar manufacturer knows how to make a semi decent vibrato nowadays.
or maybe people arent as picky. idont know.
my bigsby copy worked ok once the spring was broke in. theyre like new strings, you have to stretch them a bit till they stay in tune.

I have an SG copy by crestline. I bought a Gibson SG Deluxe many years later.
the woods are darn similar. they weight the same. the necks feel very similar, except that the Crestline has a bolt-on neck, and so you have that problem getting to the higher frets.
the Gibson inlays dont have the same appearance even tho they are both block inlays. the crestline's edges to the blocks were rounded off a little bit.
they are both made of solid mahogany bodies and necks.

if you put them side by side, next to each other, or back to back.. the shape and contours of the body are the same, except the Crestline is a little more beveled on the inner "horns" than the other.
also the Crestline is a "batwing" type like on the new SGs. mine is an older SG that has just that smaller pickguard below the strings.

the tuners werent great on the crestline, so i put on some Gotohs, which were cheaper than schaller or grover at the time but work at least as well.
the finish on the wood is fabulous on the Crestline, a deep dark red transparent stain, that lets you see the grain. it has binding on the neck, similar to the gibson.
the headstock has layered binding around the edge of the top surface, and is black, and had inlay work for the Crestline name in it. the gibson is black on top of the headstock, with no binding around the edge of the headstock, and inlays for the Gibson name on top, also the little logo they put in the middle there.
the elecronics inside is the same 500 k pots, etc.

(just a personal preference, but i like sealed tuners better than ones with just a chrome cover.)

the crestline actually had originally come with single coils. i thought they were humbuckers because they have those wider style chrome covers like they put on les pauls and SGs. but years later one of the pickups went dead, and i opened it, and found it was a single coil in there.
so then i replaced it with a humbucker pickup. the guy at the store told me that they were the same pickups they put in Gibson Les Pauls, but it didnt have the original box with it, so i wasnt so sure. but it was cheap, so i thought I'd try it out and see.
it sounded great, so i bought another one just like it.

Since I have an actual Gibson SG now, just for the heck of it, i pulled my crestline out of the closet, and plugged it into my amp, and played it, then played the gibson. they sound pretty much the same, so i think they were gibson pickups. the wood is the same type, too, so it would kinda figure they'd sound the same.

the crestline SG isnt a bad guitar for someone who can't afford a Gibson. mine worked for years as my main guitar and i had no complaints, except for the bolt on neck.
later i bought a fender strat, which, to be honest, is even more of a hindrance when playing higher frets.
but i like the sound of a strat sometimes, ya know? Sometimes I like the sound of a different guitar, so that's why I have a bunch of them.

I bought the strat because the SG needed refretted and I couldn't get it refretted then. I didnt want the lamination destroyed either, so wanted it done by a pro.
I used to play alot and wore out frets and pickups and things. I used to wear out my strings, the windings would get torn up where they sit over the fret wires becase i was so hard on them.

a crestline is probably not worth a lot, but that doesnt mean it isnt decent or worth having one.
guitars tend to get huge leaps in sales and value if a poplar rock star plays a certain kind.

for example. one year before Brian Setzer and the stray cats recorded their first album, he bought his mint condition Gretch for $100 at a pawn shop. because they weren't "popular" then.
two years later, they were worth almost a similar price as they are now.

the beatles popularized Vox amps, but they didnt especially like them. they were simpley the highest wattage amps they could afford at the time, and they could plg more than one into one amp. after they got popular Voxes were worth alot more.

Eric Clapton used to play a Les Paul, and a Marshal. He got an SG then, in the later 60's. around 68 or 69, he bought a bunch of old stratocasters from a music store for about a hundred dollars. he explained they were cheap then because not many people actually played strats.
they liked Rickenbackers and gretches and Gibsons more. strats were a "dime a dozen". he took the strats apart and built strats (about a dozen of them) from the parts. He gave some to freinds. George Harrison a white one. He kept a few for himself, one was a black one, one was a brown sunburst.
i heard this in a interview on him years ago.

kurt cobain liked the old fender jaguars and mustangs, because they were cheap. in fact, i recall seeing them in pawnshops, and stuff, and people saying how they were really awful, and never stayed in tune. they were cheap till Nirvana popularized them again.
now they cost at least as much as the other fenders, but they were always just bottom line fenders, from way back.

i had a harmony rocket as my first electric, it was cheap,(used, but barel used) so my parents got it for me.
I loved the guitar for a long time. still have it, and like it. people would think i was nuts for liking it.
Now the darn rockets are going for around $300-$400.
I guess someone figured out they were made of solid maple and mahogany, not cheap laminates, and they had DeArmond pickups on them.
the wiring is extra extra sheilded inside them, and despite its age never had anything fail to work right on it.
has nice sunburst paint job and bindings and stuff.

how much a guitar is worth, just depends on who is buying and who is selling, and how much they agree it's worth.

this was kinda long.. guess i am sort of overly bored at home right now. lol

--dan

Re: crestline guitars

: : Does anyone know who manufactured crestline guitars?

: hmm.. it's not nice to knock someone else guitar, especially if they like it. The crestline SG was not junk.

: http://store.bluebookinc.com/downloads/BrowseCategory.asp?Product=electricguitar&Heading=212
: bluebook says:
: Crestline:
: Instruments previously built in Japan circa mid to late 1970s. Distributed by the Grossman Music Corporation of Cleveland, Ohio.
: These entry level to intermediate solid body guitars featured designs based on classic American favorites. Crestline offered a wide range of stringed instruments, including classical, folk, dreadnought, and 12-string acoustics; solid body electric guitars and basses; amplifiers; banjos, mandolins, and ukuleles. Considering the amount of instruments available, the Crestline trademark was probably used on guitars built by one of the bigger Japanese guitar producers and rebranded for the U.S. market. One model reviewed at a vintage guitar show was based on Gibson´s Les Paul design, and had Grover tuners, 2 Japanese covered humbuckers, and decent wood.

: i wrote a review about my Crestline SG at Harmony Central's site.
: I also own a bunch of guitars. the Crestline SG was my first solidbody electric that i bought for myself.
: in the mid to late 70's, the music store i used to get lessons at carried Gibson, Fender, Baldwin, Conn, Yamaha(accosutics only), and Crestline.

: A new Crestline SG with the bigsby style tremelo was a little over $300 (US dollars). about 339 or 349.
: they also has les paul copies by Crestline there, they had one with one of those yellowish red sunburst finishes, about $289 if i recall... so the prices were similar.
: I got mine there for $133, but that was about 10 years later. it was one of a few older guitars they had forgotten about in their warehouse.. old stock, but new, so they decided to sell them off, cheap. mine had a few scratches on the back and on the back of the neck, but was ok.
: it didnt stay in tune well when it was new, but the strings that came on it were the original old strings. the bigsby spring needed to break in a bit to stabilize, and new strings helped.
: it would stay in tune better with 10s than 9's, and with ernie ball, or adarios.. regular electric strings.

: i used to abuse the strings terribley with major tremelo use. at the time I recall people always said you had to have a real gibson or a real strat, and that vibrato bars were for basicly, idiots. no serious guitar player.
: funny how a few years later they became popular again. then they started to design better tremeloes for the folks that wanted to do major dive bombs without it going out of tune.
: kah;ler had a good one then, so did some others. then later floyd roses came out. floyd rose bought out their competition, as i recall.
: but nearly any guitar manufacturer knows how to make a semi decent vibrato nowadays.
: or maybe people arent as picky. idont know.
: my bigsby copy worked ok once the spring was broke in. theyre like new strings, you have to stretch them a bit till they stay in tune.

: I have an SG copy by crestline. I bought a Gibson SG Deluxe many years later.
: the woods are darn similar. they weight the same. the necks feel very similar, except that the Crestline has a bolt-on neck, and so you have that problem getting to the higher frets.
: the Gibson inlays dont have the same appearance even tho they are both block inlays. the crestline's edges to the blocks were rounded off a little bit.
: they are both made of solid mahogany bodies and necks.

: if you put them side by side, next to each other, or back to back.. the shape and contours of the body are the same, except the Crestline is a little more beveled on the inner "horns" than the other.
: also the Crestline is a "batwing" type like on the new SGs. mine is an older SG that has just that smaller pickguard below the strings.

: the tuners werent great on the crestline, so i put on some Gotohs, which were cheaper than schaller or grover at the time but work at least as well.
: the finish on the wood is fabulous on the Crestline, a deep dark red transparent stain, that lets you see the grain. it has binding on the neck, similar to the gibson.
: the headstock has layered binding around the edge of the top surface, and is black, and had inlay work for the Crestline name in it. the gibson is black on top of the headstock, with no binding around the edge of the headstock, and inlays for the Gibson name on top, also the little logo they put in the middle there.
: the elecronics inside is the same 500 k pots, etc.

: (just a personal preference, but i like sealed tuners better than ones with just a chrome cover.)

: the crestline actually had originally come with single coils. i thought they were humbuckers because they have those wider style chrome covers like they put on les pauls and SGs. but years later one of the pickups went dead, and i opened it, and found it was a single coil in there.
: so then i replaced it with a humbucker pickup. the guy at the store told me that they were the same pickups they put in Gibson Les Pauls, but it didnt have the original box with it, so i wasnt so sure. but it was cheap, so i thought I'd try it out and see.
: it sounded great, so i bought another one just like it.

: Since I have an actual Gibson SG now, just for the heck of it, i pulled my crestline out of the closet, and plugged it into my amp, and played it, then played the gibson. they sound pretty much the same, so i think they were gibson pickups. the wood is the same type, too, so it would kinda figure they'd sound the same.

: the crestline SG isnt a bad guitar for someone who can't afford a Gibson. mine worked for years as my main guitar and i had no complaints, except for the bolt on neck.
: later i bought a fender strat, which, to be honest, is even more of a hindrance when playing higher frets.
: but i like the sound of a strat sometimes, ya know? Sometimes I like the sound of a different guitar, so that's why I have a bunch of them.

: I bought the strat because the SG needed refretted and I couldn't get it refretted then. I didnt want the lamination destroyed either, so wanted it done by a pro.
: I used to play alot and wore out frets and pickups and things. I used to wear out my strings, the windings would get torn up where they sit over the fret wires becase i was so hard on them.

: a crestline is probably not worth a lot, but that doesnt mean it isnt decent or worth having one.
: guitars tend to get huge leaps in sales and value if a poplar rock star plays a certain kind.

: for example. one year before Brian Setzer and the stray cats recorded their first album, he bought his mint condition Gretch for $100 at a pawn shop. because they weren't "popular" then.
: two years later, they were worth almost a similar price as they are now.

: the beatles popularized Vox amps, but they didnt especially like them. they were simpley the highest wattage amps they could afford at the time, and they could plg more than one into one amp. after they got popular Voxes were worth alot more.
:
: Eric Clapton used to play a Les Paul, and a Marshal. He got an SG then, in the later 60's. around 68 or 69, he bought a bunch of old stratocasters from a music store for about a hundred dollars. he explained they were cheap then because not many people actually played strats.
: they liked Rickenbackers and gretches and Gibsons more. strats were a "dime a dozen". he took the strats apart and built strats (about a dozen of them) from the parts. He gave some to freinds. George Harrison a white one. He kept a few for himself, one was a black one, one was a brown sunburst.
: i heard this in a interview on him years ago.

: kurt cobain liked the old fender jaguars and mustangs, because they were cheap. in fact, i recall seeing them in pawnshops, and stuff, and people saying how they were really awful, and never stayed in tune. they were cheap till Nirvana popularized them again.
: now they cost at least as much as the other fenders, but they were always just bottom line fenders, from way back.

: i had a harmony rocket as my first electric, it was cheap,(used, but barel used) so my parents got it for me.
: I loved the guitar for a long time. still have it, and like it. people would think i was nuts for liking it.
: Now the darn rockets are going for around $300-$400.
: I guess someone figured out they were made of solid maple and mahogany, not cheap laminates, and they had DeArmond pickups on them.
: the wiring is extra extra sheilded inside them, and despite its age never had anything fail to work right on it.
: has nice sunburst paint job and bindings and stuff.

: how much a guitar is worth, just depends on who is buying and who is selling, and how much they agree it's worth.

: this was kinda long.. guess i am sort of overly bored at home right now. lol

: --dan

Just wanted to let everyone know, I have a crestline guitar given to me by a friend. It seems it is a strat copy but on the junior scale with a thin body. The instrument is solid wood ( of what type I do not know)not quite 2 inches thick, with a bolt on neck.
I am using this instrument for home recording and it does a good job of delivering a " k-chink " sound for funkier tunes.
Action on this guitar is super low so it is easy to play. I can leave this thing in the case for 2 months not even touch it and it is still in tune at 440. It is the most reliable guitar I have and probably the most fun to play when plugged in. The sound almost reminds me of a Jimmy Reed meets Jimmy Ray Vaughn sound.
Just thought I would drop in and share my story.

Re: crestline guitars

: Does anyone know who manufactured crestline guitars?

Just wanted to let everyone know, I have a crestline guitar given to me by a friend. It seems it is a strat copy but on the junior scale with a thin body. The instrument is solid wood ( of what type I do not know)not quite 2 inches thick, with a bolt on neck.
I am using this instrument for home recording and it does a good job of delivering a " k-chink " sound for funkier tunes.
Action on this guitar is super low so it is easy to play. I can leave this thing in the case for 2 months not even touch it and it is still in tune at 440. It is the most reliable guitar I have and probably the most fun to play when plugged in. The sound almost reminds me of a Jimmy Reed meets Jimmy Ray Vaughn sound.
Just thought I would drop in and share my story.

Crestline Acoustic

I am the proud owner of a mid-70s vintage Crestline acoustic Model CR9000. This guitar has given me 40 years of playing and listening pleasure. Like so many other comments, I've found my Crestline to be very comparable to the better known American brands of that era. I have a Guild D-35 of the same vintage and I often find myself choosing to play the Crestline over the Guild. Granted the Guild has a better sound, but I find the Crestline to be easier to play. This opinion is shared by friends that have played both guitars. The Crestline "feels" very comfortable and the neck and frets make it feel like it could play itself. Amazingly, this guitar has taken a fair amount of abuse, yet still plays and sounds great. It has been camping, on picnics, clambakes, parties, etc. It has had beer, wine, and other beverages spilled on it as well as different smoking materials and ashes dropped on it. It was even dropped by a friend 30 years ago that resulted in a crack on the neck. Remarkably, this guitar still stays in tune! Nothing has been replaced. It is all original. I'm guessing someone will be playing and enjoying this guitar long after I'm gone.
BTW, I got my Crestline from my brother. He and a friend were co-owners of a music store on the west side of Cleveland and got about 1/2 doz. of them from Grossman Music (as cited in other comments). My brother still has the Crestline he "requisitioned" from the store (store only lasted about 6 months). He likes his as much as I like mine.

CR9000

I bought my CR900 in 1979. Thing still stays in tune. It is till death do we part. The only set back is the nut is not too wide and I am.

crestline guitar

I have a crestline flattop acoustic, model cit950. my wife gave it to me brand new in 1976. I love it and still have it. Are there any comments or complaints about this nice instrument?

Crestline Gibson Les Paul Copy

I have a 1977 Crestline Les Pul Copy and I love the guitar! it's got a solid bound body the Finnish on the guitar is like the day it was made neck is great and nice low action with no fret buzz. Vintage Made in Japan Gem!

Crestline ES 175

I just picked up a Crestline ES 175 Hollow Body exact Gibson duplicate minus the name with a set neck. AMAZING guitar with Grover tuners and tobacco sunburst made with nice solid wood. Go look at a Gibson es175 and you will see my Crestline. I love it and the are selling in the $1200 range on ebay and yakaz.8WAM

Crestline 175

I just bought a blond/natural 175 with the Gibson tune-a-matic bridge and les paul type stop tailpiece. Does your 175 have a stop tailpiece or the trapeze style?

I also have a Crestline Flying V minus the bolt on neck. It has a Fender style tremelo bridge.

Crestline Guitar

I own a Crestline Les Paul copy. I bought it new in about '78. It is still my fav even thought I almost killed the fingerboard with amateurish attempts at fine tuning. I am sure it is not worth anything since have changed everything except the body, tuners and neck(it still has the original frets)Even to this day it has no defects due to poor manufacturing. I would put it's playability up against anything. I am one who thinks that they built these things right. The Japanese just don't do anything half assed.

CRESTLINE GUITARS MIJ

Regarding lawsuits over Crestline & other guitars manufactured in Japan it is important to stay with the facts. Fender did not litigate with any Japan manufacturer. In fact the only litigation was Norlin's and was settled out of court. Neither Crestline nor any other company was sued out of business for copying models.

Regarding Crestline guitar quality it is just like any other guitar builder. They did offer low / medium / high end lines. So depending on the model you coudl have a Beginner / Intermediate or a Pro level instrument. Another factor for quality is when manufactured. Obviously most of the 1960's era guitars out of Japan were cheap copies. The 1970's saw the emergence of Japanese products made as good and often better than USA counterparts. this carries over to guitar manufacturing as well as auto & many other product lines. Hell they ruled stereo electronics.

Not being an expert on Crestline I can say the one and only Crestline I have is a very well made telecaster. With a bound top, a neck that doesn't get better, quality pickups all in all great tone & playability. The only thing I don't like about it was the Tuning Machines which as we know is an easy fix.

Whenever I'm asked is a model or manufacturer of a particular guitar any good my pat answer is. You take guitars one at a time. Don't generalize you never know where you'll find a gem. I know this Crestline Tele is. Now that's coming from somebody that has had over 30 Tele's & ASATS

CRESTLINE GUITARS MIJ

Regarding lawsuits over Crestline & other guitars manufactured in Japan it is important to stay with the facts. Fender did not litigate with any Japan manufacturer. In fact the only litigation was Norlin's and was settled out of court. Neither Crestline nor any other company was sued out of business for copying models.

Regarding Crestline guitar quality it is just like any other guitar builder. They did offer low / medium / high end lines. So depending on the model you coudl have a Beginner / Intermediate or a Pro level instrument. Another factor for quality is when manufactured. Obviously most of the 1960's era guitars out of Japan were cheap copies. The 1970's saw the emergence of Japanese products made as good and often better than USA counterparts. this carries over to guitar manufacturing as well as auto & many other product lines. Hell they ruled stereo electronics.

Not being an expert on Crestline I can say the one and only Crestline I have is a very well made telecaster. With a bound top, a neck that doesn't get better, quality pickups all in all great tone & playability. The only thing I don't like about it was the Tuning Machines which as we know is an easy fix.

Whenever I'm asked is a model or manufacturer of a particular guitar any good my pat answer is. You take guitars one at a time. Don't generalize you never know where you'll find a gem. I know this Crestline Tele is. Now that's coming from somebody that has had over 30 Tele's & ASATS

Crestline

For future Crestline searchers, Crestline was the house brand for Grossman Music Corp of Cleveland, Ohio who were
musical instrument importers / distributors. They were acquired by Grover Musical Products.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grover_Musical_Products,_Inc.

The guitars were made by various Japanese manufacturers, many from the Matsumoko area which were known for
making excellent copies of very high quality. Other brands made by these manufacturers are Maya, Aria, Electra,
Westone, etc. so the quality of your Crestline depends on which company got the manufacturing contract and when
it was made. My 80's Crestline Gibson Marauder copy is very well made except for the tuners with the sheetmetal
covers, which were the big weak point in Japanese guitars.

Crestline

Check me out on YouTube. Search akamarvinplayer.

Crestline

I recently saw photos of a Crestline CR-28 dreadnought.

The interior label had Crestline written in script.

The back of the headstock had individual tuners, not the tree type.

Back of the guitar had a decorative stripe down the middle.

Dot fret markers.

Crestline

I just happen to come across this site while looking up the crestline guitar,i am a proud owner of an acoustic crestline 610.the neck is smooth and the sound is great and it has an adjustable bridge i don't know where the info is coming from that it was made in japan maybe the electric guitars,mine was made in korea and this guitar was made in the mid 70's.i should know it was a xmas present from my parents.i don't care what people say but they don't make guitars like this anymore.i prefer this acoustic over my ibanez and seagull.and when i go to guitar stores to possibly pick up a new acoustic i compare it to my crestline and put it down and go out empty handed,maybe its sentimental or its that its just a great guitar.

Find out about my Crestline acoustic guitar.

I got a Crestline acoustic 6 strings guitar , it said Crestline on top buy the strings and made in Korea, I can't make out the second letter or number on model # and the last number or letter. I think it's model #CIT810, CVT810, or CIT81D, CVT81D.But one of those or the model #.

Crestline Electric Guitars

Crestline was made in Japan.
They made an overwhelmingly excellent quality guitar for low cost.
US markets sued them and that was the end.
If you come across a Crestline, especially a solid body LS style, note the weight and balance.
They are high quality guitars that are built to last.

Crestline ukuleles

Does anyone have any info on the Crestline ukuleles? I just picked up a soprano uke model A83.
Any info would be appreciated.

Crestline acoustic guitar

I was given a Crestline acoustic guitar but not sure if it’s the real deal. The model number is CIT 20S and I can’t find any info about it. On the inside it says Global Musical Instruments Co LTD. very light weight, 6 string. Any idea?

I have an excellent made

I have an excellent made Crestline LP custom, black with gold hardware. Im the original owner. Got it in 1981. It has a set neck which is one of the best necks ive played. Like others, heavy and well made. Came new with Grover tuners. Players who gave tried itband checked it out usually say something like “Gibson probably made this”, its that good of a guitar. Never had a serial number, still has the little gold sticker on the back of the neck/headstock “Made in Japan”. Headstock shape is not exact replica of a gibson, top is slightly different. Dimensionally, i bought a pink/red lined tan Gibson LP case for it years ago and fit in there just like my real LP. Mostly ive seen bolt on necks but mine is just like a LP its set. Has all the multlayer binding around the top and one less layer around the headstock. The Crestline name is just like a LP made of pearl or abalone. Has a gold “seal” with small creatline on it on the center face of the headstock. Guitar was my main guitar for years had 2 fret hones, plays real good! All guitars should play as quick as it! Love it. Sounds like a shallow LP or a thick Tele when on the bridge pickup. Unique sound but everyone loves it.

Crestline Guitar

I would like to know how to find out what kinda crestline electric guitar that I have and what it may be worth thanks to who ever May answer.

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