Looking for a decent beginners guitar

hi, I am just looking for a decent quality guitar for beginners, and I was wondering if you guys give me a few hints to help me out.

My friend recommended this guitar by Washburn brand for me.
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Washburn-D100DL-Acoustic-Guitar-with-Gig-Bag?sku=513382

I also found another Washburn acoustic guitar that comes with a case
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Washburn-D10S-Acoustic-Guitar-?sku=515152

which one do you guys recommend?
feedbacks please :D

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Well, the BEST guitar for a beginner, would be the most expensive quality guitar you can get, yet this is not in the buget of most beginning guitarists. At the same time, you have to take into consideration of what you want to spend then go into a music store and try the various guitars. It is important to not only have a quality sounding instrument, but one that plays well. The look of the guitar, unless that is important to you, should be last on your list. The reason I would suggest that you try the instrument, is that even less expensive guitars can sometimes, depending on a lot of chance can sound great and some expensive guitars can also sound bad for the same reason. It is not usual that you would buy and expensive guitar and it sounds bad, but it could happen. This is why it is really important to try it out. AT the same time, as beginners are unsure of what to look for in a good guitar, it would be wise to try to find someone that know a little bit about the instrument to go with you and possibly try the guitars for you. Hope that helps!

so, this guitars been fantastic. Im loving it.
I just learned most of notes and classic songs. some chords and all
any websites that you recommend? Ive been using hal leonard's "learn how to play guitar for beginners".

Any recoomendations? that;d be great.
Merry xmas everyone

So I have been reading through these posts as they come and I have a few questions. Like NewGuitar07, I am looking to pick up an acoustic guitar. I am a begnner, and am in the process of researching some stuff. All your replies have been pretty helpful.
I don't have any friends or family who play the guitar so I will have to go it alone when going to buy one. I was curious if there was anything I should look or listen for when trying to pick one out. From what I have been reading, i need to play the guitar, listen to it, see how it feels...but as I am not familiar with any of this, I am afraid of getting stuck with something crappy.

any advice would be much appreciated!

Firstly, I'm glad that newg07 found the advice helpful and is really getting into the Washburn. All the best for 2008 :D

Secondly, just as happy to read that CAbeginner found the thread useful. It's always a bit daunting getting an instrument without knowledge or useful friends/family. First off, are you sure? Try a "does anybody play guitar?" at your works canteen or out for a drink with friends. You never know, somebody you trust may have a hobby unknown to you.

If that fails, here's a bit of general advice based on my exp getting a trumpet for my son. None of us could blow a note but we got the (very cheap and good value) Stagg without any major drama. First, you need a bit of research and you've already done that. All of the dreadnoughts discussed in this thread are capable of playing nicely; I don't think any will sound like lard. Your main worry is if the one in the shop has taken a knock or if it's been set up by the gormless apprentice who's already late for lunch.

I'm assuming you're in California; I was wondering if you were thinking of starting straight away with a guitar teacher or trying a bit of strumming for yourself first. If the former, then do what I did with the trumpet. Buy it with the (written, if necessary) proviso that you take it back for a full refund if your teacher says it's a dog. If you're really, really on your own; here's a few tips I can think of. Others might add to them.

The "mom and pop" shop selling acoustics is likely to have them better set up than the big chainstores in your area. The drawback is that the small independents often charge full RRP whereas Musician's Friend and the like have heavy discounts. Either way, decide on the acoustics you're interested in before entering. I say this because some salestypes see you as a mark, don't have that guitar in stock anyway and spin you a "oh, we had loads of trouble with those. Switched to the Nungai D20 which is only $40 more and twice as good" story. I've had this happen to me with hifi separates before I realized what a fool I'd been. Use the "I'm OK just for now" line with salestypes unless and until there is a problem getting them off their wallhooks.

Things to look for are any cracks in the finish, especially if they appear to be going into the wood. Binding (usually white, around body and neck edges); is it lifting anywhere? Starting at the bottom end, look at the bridge. Is the rosewood lifting from the guitar surface? Do the strings sit nicely on the ivoroid saddle or are there nasty looking chips? As those strings go up the neck, do they stay inside the width of it - I've seen bad ones that don't. Do the strings sit nicely in the grooves of the nut at the end of the neck? Do the tuners resist very gentle turning pressure (good) or do they swing 180 degrees if blown upon (bad)?

If you can, without attracting too much attention, try the guitar for feel; preferably sitting or at least able to bend one leg at right angles. The "classical" position is to have the rounded cutout resting on your LEFT thigh (assuming you're a right hander) but many like the rockier-pose of resting on the right thigh. Make sure that both seem OK. Get your hand around the neck near the 1st fret. I know you're new, but try holding down strings with some fingers while the thumb's on the back of the neck. See if another guitar feels more comfortable if it's really hard.

Another thing to quickly try is action and intonation. See if you can hold down the thickest string in the space on the fingerboard before the first fret. Does it buzz no matter how hard you try? hmmm. Now try it with the same string in the space after the doubledotted fret. Does it sound an octave higher or is it sharp/flat? Is it ridiculously hard to press down here, because the string is like a half-inch off the fingerboard? That can indicate bad action or intonation, but it's difficult to be sure because absolute beginners have trouble holding down strings to start with. You could also try a very gentle strum of all strings (of course, it may be slightly out of tune) to get an idea of the guitar's tone.

One Important Last Thing
Do not get pressured into making a purchase there and then just because some salestype is hanging over you all the time. Take time to go home and re-examine your gut feelings. If you have to, use the cover story that you were meant to be joined by your experienced-guitarist friend but he called it off at the last minute. You're just getting a feel of the ones he suggested to save time when you next come in with him :wink:

Back to resources for learning, I had a look at the "smart guy reviews" website that's sometimes advertized here, and a few others. A lot of hefty recommendations for "Learn and Master Guitar" which is not so much an online course as a whole-kaboodle set of DVDs, booklet, email and forum support. The only criticism it ever gets is from pretty advanced players who didn't learn much new. Beginners and intermediates all 5* rate it. Never seen it myself and it's an eye-watering price; even with a three-day sale at the moment reducing the price to $149
http://www.learnandmasterguitar.com/three_day_sale.htm

Mustard mitt, Music Master Pro is megacheap by comparison for a one-off $30. I had the great misfortune to click on Jay Dynasty's (whattaname) clips of his bass playing; surprisingly turgid and with the most appalling tone, to boot. At least his guitar clips sound like he can play. The only problem with strictly online methods is if, like me, you tend to compute in a cramped, disorganized mess of an office room, it's not the ideal place to be practising (note to Jay's website manager; "practice" is a noun and "practise" is a verb and, also, you don't "imply" the best methods - you "employ" them).

1bassleft wrote:
Firstly, I'm glad that newg07 found the advice helpful and is really getting into the Washburn. All the best for 2008 :D

Secondly, just as happy to read that CAbeginner found the thread useful. It's always a bit daunting getting an instrument without knowledge or useful friends/family. First off, are you sure? Try a "does anybody play guitar?" at your works canteen or out for a drink with friends. You never know, somebody you trust may have a hobby unknown to you.

If that fails, here's a bit of general advice based on my exp getting a trumpet for my son. None of us could blow a note but we got the (very cheap and good value) Stagg without any major drama. First, you need a bit of research and you've already done that. All of the dreadnoughts discussed in this thread are capable of playing nicely; I don't think any will sound like lard. Your main worry is if the one in the shop has taken a knock or if it's been set up by the gormless apprentice who's already late for lunch.

I'm assuming you're in California; I was wondering if you were thinking of starting straight away with a guitar teacher or trying a bit of strumming for yourself first. If the former, then do what I did with the trumpet. Buy it with the (written, if necessary) proviso that you take it back for a full refund if your teacher says it's a dog. If you're really, really on your own; here's a few tips I can think of. Others might add to them.

The "mom and pop" shop selling acoustics is likely to have them better set up than the big chainstores in your area. The drawback is that the small independents often charge full RRP whereas Musician's Friend and the like have heavy discounts. Either way, decide on the acoustics you're interested in before entering. I say this because some salestypes see you as a mark, don't have that guitar in stock anyway and spin you a "oh, we had loads of trouble with those. Switched to the Nungai D20 which is only $40 more and twice as good" story. I've had this happen to me with hifi separates before I realized what a fool I'd been. Use the "I'm OK just for now" line with salestypes unless and until there is a problem getting them off their wallhooks.

Things to look for are any cracks in the finish, especially if they appear to be going into the wood. Binding (usually white, around body and neck edges); is it lifting anywhere? Starting at the bottom end, look at the bridge. Is the rosewood lifting from the guitar surface? Do the strings sit nicely on the ivoroid saddle or are there nasty looking chips? As those strings go up the neck, do they stay inside the width of it - I've seen bad ones that don't. Do the strings sit nicely in the grooves of the nut at the end of the neck? Do the tuners resist very gentle turning pressure (good) or do they swing 180 degrees if blown upon (bad)?

If you can, without attracting too much attention, try the guitar for feel; preferably sitting or at least able to bend one leg at right angles. The "classical" position is to have the rounded cutout resting on your LEFT thigh (assuming you're a right hander) but many like the rockier-pose of resting on the right thigh. Make sure that both seem OK. Get your hand around the neck near the 1st fret. I know you're new, but try holding down strings with some fingers while the thumb's on the back of the neck. See if another guitar feels more comfortable if it's really hard.

Another thing to quickly try is action and intonation. See if you can hold down the thickest string in the space on the fingerboard before the first fret. Does it buzz no matter how hard you try? hmmm. Now try it with the same string in the space after the doubledotted fret. Does it sound an octave higher or is it sharp/flat? Is it ridiculously hard to press down here, because the string is like a half-inch off the fingerboard? That can indicate bad action or intonation, but it's difficult to be sure because absolute beginners have trouble holding down strings to start with. You could also try a very gentle strum of all strings (of course, it may be slightly out of tune) to get an idea of the guitar's tone.

One Important Last Thing
Do not get pressured into making a purchase there and then just because some salestype is hanging over you all the time. Take time to go home and re-examine your gut feelings. If you have to, use the cover story that you were meant to be joined by your experienced-guitarist friend but he called it off at the last minute. You're just getting a feel of the ones he suggested to save time when you next come in with him :wink:

:shock:

yeah im really enjoying the washburn acoustic I got.
It's just perfect for me. I carry it in a hard shell case with me whenever I fly(usually once in three months or so)

well, here's my tip for the new comer.

Just like everyone else saying, try out the actual guitar before buying it. I went to a local instrument store with my friend who has been playing guitar for years and checked out several acoustics. Out of all, for some reason I loved the sound of the washburn acoustic, but the price was more expansive than the one online, so I ordered mine from musiciansfriend.

When I got it, some of my pals played the guitar to check if it sounded right and stuff like that. I heard that if you order guitars online, some of them don't sound clear as they are supposed to..I wouldn't go into details because I'm not an expert or anything, but that's logical for everyone.

I'm definitely glad that I didn't get a cheap/crappy guitar. Learning guitar requires lots of patience and practice, and I can't imagine myself learning all the new stuff with a guitar that doesn't even make clear sounds.

My guitar is absolutely perfect for me right now, and I'm so addicted to it. I just want to play more and more.

well, hope these help.

Great to hear NewGuitar. I definitely think the Washburn was the right purchase for you and anyone else in Newy's position should take note of your enjoyment from it.

Sometimes guitars picked up in store sound a little nicer to begin with because they've been setup and tinkered with before sale. That's unlikely to happen at a warehouse from one of the online stores. It's a pleasant benefit for new guitarists when they buy at brick and mortar.

Nevertheless, ordering online can save cash and the sound is still going to be the same at the end of the day.

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