Home Forums Discussion Popular Topics Advice on Chaining Fender Amps?

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  • #19476
    Anonymous
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    OK, I’ve been playing various 60’s and 70’s Fender amps for a decade now. Only recently have I noticed that apparently a few of my heroes (Ted Nugent, Jimi Hendrix and Steve Jones) used to chain several amps together using the #2 inputs on them. You know, plugging the guiar signal into the #1 input on one side (let’s just say the "Vibrato" side), and linking another amp out of the #2 input on that same channel.

    So, currently my 3 amps of choice (all Fenders, of course) are a ’72 Quad Reverb, a ’74 Twin Reverb, and a ’76 Vibro Sonic. Is it safe to run these amps together in that fashion (guitar into #1 on the Quad, out of #2 into #1 on the Twin, out of #2 and into #1 on my Vibro)? I refuse to buy a patchbay or split my signal with some piece of modern crap that will kill my tone. But I also don’t want to blow my amps up.

    Does anyone know whether or not this is safe for my amps? Thanks!

    Heath L.

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    • #32944
      Anonymous
      Guest

      It is called "channel jumping"—it just creates an overdrive channel somehow or other. I do it with my AC30 and my Plexi. Alot of people do it.

      : Related issue. What’s the principle behind using a patch cable to connect two inputs on a
      : four input amp. E.g. of an old amp I saw (long ago, can’t remember make, though I
      : remember that the band in question used an old Marshall head, a silverface Twin, and an
      : AC30). Four inputs, 2 above 2, patch cord connected diagonally across the inputs.

    • #32493
      Anonymous
      Guest

      : :I have a ’68 super and I used a stomp box with two stereo outputs to split my signal to my
      : solid state marshall rack system. This caused many problems such as increased hum from
      : my strat and unwanted noise every time I stomped the damn thing.A music store owner conviced
      : me to try the #2 plug.After all, he said Hendrix and SRV did this to acheve there tone.
      : Well I’ve ben doing this for about a year now and my tone is the best i’ve ever had. Oh,
      : and my strat hum is softer and no more cracks when I stomp my box. I believe slaving amps
      : is the overall best way maximize tone,and we all play better when we can hear our guitars.
      : JUAN FELIPE’
      : MONSTER SPACE TOAST

    • #32491
      Anonymous
      Guest

      :I have a ’68 super and I used a stomp box with two stereo outputs to split my signal to my
      solid state marshall rack system. This caused many problems such as increased hum from
      my strat and unwanted noise every time I stomped the damn thing.A music store owner conviced
      me to try the #2 plug.After all, he said Hendrix and SRV did this to acheve there tone.
      Well I’ve ben doing this for about a year now and my tone is the best i’ve ever had. Oh,
      and my strat hum is softer and now more cracks when I stomp my box. I believe slaving amps
      is the overall best way maximise tone,and we all play better when we can hear our guitars.
      JUAN FELIPE’
      MONSTER SPACE TOAST

    • #31025
      Anonymous
      Guest

      This will definitely not harm your amps when plugged as describe (Input #2 of Amp 1 plugged into either Amp 2 input). And I agree with your aversion to splitting your signal. However, you may want to consider that you ARE splitting the signal anyway because that second input is not an output and therefore no gain is added. The first amp’s signal is reduced by only a small small amount because there is some resistance between the two inputs (you’ve probably noticed that if you plug into number 2 the signal is not quite as hot). If you look closely, you may find that the secondary amps are often on standby.

      : OK, I’ve been playing various 60’s and 70’s Fender amps for a decade now. Only recently have I noticed that apparently a few of my heroes (Ted Nugent, Jimi Hendrix and Steve Jones) used to chain several amps together using the #2 inputs on them. You know, plugging the guiar signal into the #1 input on one side (let’s just say the "Vibrato" side), and linking another amp out of the #2 input on that same channel.

      : So, currently my 3 amps of choice (all Fenders, of course) are a ’72 Quad Reverb, a ’74 Twin Reverb, and a ’76 Vibro Sonic. Is it safe to run these amps together in that fashion (guitar into #1 on the Quad, out of #2 into #1 on the Twin, out of #2 and into #1 on my Vibro)? I refuse to buy a patchbay or split my signal with some piece of modern crap that will kill my tone. But I also don’t want to blow my amps up.

      : Does anyone know whether or not this is safe for my amps? Thanks!

      : Heath L.

    • #31015
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Related issue. What’s the principle behind using a patch cable to connect two inputs on a
      four input amp. E.g. of an old amp I saw (long ago, can’t remember make, though I
      remember that the band in question used an old Marshall head, a silverface Twin, and an
      AC30). Four inputs, 2 above 2, patch cord connected diagonally across the inputs.

    • #31003
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Hmm.Don’t much about the vibrosonic.How many watts is it?It’s generally not a good idea to link a powerful amp into a weaker one,you could bust the speaker,or maybe blow it apart.I link up two Twins and won’t worry
      about it,they’re both 85 watts RMS.I’d link the weaker amp to the stronger amp,ect.,ect.Check with an amp guy.
      I’d also like to know what he says.Hmm.
      Good Luck,be careful.

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