Guitarsite Forums Discussion Popular Topics What is the difference between major and perfect?

  • This topic has 3 replies, 1 voice, and was last updated 24 years ago by Anonymous.
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  • #19324
    Anonymous
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    In studying theory, I’ve noticed that some intervals are said to be major, and some are said to be perfect. 2nd, 3rd, 6th, and 7th are major. 4th, 5th, and 8th (octave) are perfect. What makes major intervals major and perfect intervals perfect? Or does it have nothing to do with the interval, and only the frequency of the note?(because I am looking at the C scale as an example). I’ve lost sleep over this problem. Please help.

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    • #26742
      Anonymous
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      The distance from the Root to any note is a Quantitive interval.
      The distance from any any note to any other is called a qualitive interval.
      The interval names are built in half steps and are named after the terms major and minor.As you probably know they run in the order of;
      Root
      min.2nd
      Maj.2nd
      m3rd
      M3rd
      P4th
      b5th
      P5th
      m6th
      M6th
      m7th
      M7
      Octave

      When you take away all of the Major intervals they become the Major scale R,M2,M3,P4th,P5th,M6th,M7th,Oct.
      Leaving behind..m2,m3,b5th,m6th,m7th
      So the distance from any min. or Maj. relates to Qualitive or Quantitive.But when you go backwards from say Oct. to m6th.this is called a lowered 5th.
      So the distance from Root to any note is a Quana
      tive.Any distance from one note to another is Qualitive
      Any desending can be considered a lowerd interval

    • #26703
      Anonymous
      Guest

      Ryan;
      U are correct in saying that 2nd, 3rd, 6th, and 7th are major. 4th, 5th, and 8th (octave) are perfect. But
      1 (unison)like 2 instruments playing the same note is also perfect. Intervals are various combinations of half-steps. Changing the intervals
      with flats or sharps, changes them from Major and Perfect into minor, diminished and augmented. The entire set of major and perfect intervals are called diatonic intervals. I hope this helps
      Black Owl

    • #26704
      Anonymous
      Guest

      i think that its just names. like, they’re just called that cause thats the way it is. just focus on the difference in sounds rather than the names. im not totally sure about the names, but my second bit is true.

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